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Refused to board (Chinese passport for Australian international transit)

5 Discussions

Snail

Member since 16 Jan 2018

Total posts 16

So my misses holds a passport from the people's republic of China, and she was flying from Christchurch to Shanghai via Sydney. The Christchurch to Sydney was supposed to be on Qantas, and China Eastern to Shanghai. We were told that her luggage would be checked all the way through, which meant she didn't need to through Australia immigration.
But she was denied a boarding pass as she does not hold an Australian visa, but when went through the Australian immigration website it clearly stated that if her onward flight is within 8 hours and if she does not need to leave the transit lounge, she doesn't have to get a visa?

I had to pay a hefty amount to get her on Singapore airline but that meant she would have to arrive in Shanghai at 6am tomorrow morning with our 5yo.

Am I missing something here?

ChrisCh

Member since 24 Apr 2012

Total posts 1,026

Check-in staff were correct: passport holders from the PRC require a transit visa to transit Australia, even if not leaving the international transit area or 'entering' Australia.

Passport holders from many other countries are exempted from getting a transit visa, but the PRC is not one of them. See here for more details.

The website states "If you are transiting though Australia for less than eight hours and you do not need to leave the airport transit lounge (except to board your connecting flight), you may not need to apply for a Transit visa (subclass 771). If you belong to one of the categories and meet the criteria outlined below, you can transit through Australia without applying for a visa."

"The following categories of travellers are eligible to transit through Australia without applying for a visa if they also meet the criteria below:

  • Citizens of the following countries:
    Andorra, Argentina, Austria, Belgium, Brunei, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Kiribati, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mexico, Monaco, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Oman, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Romania, Samoa, San Marino, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, Tonga, Tuvalu, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom (including its colonies), United States of America, Uruguay, Vanuatu and Vatican.
  • Residents of Hong Kong holding a Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) passport or a British National Overseas (BNO) passport.
  • Residents of Taiwan holding a passport issued by the authorities of Taiwan (other than passports purported to be official or diplomatic passports).
  • Indian official passport holders.
  • Diplomatic passport holders, excluding holders of:
    • Arab Non-National Passports; and
    • Diplomatic passports from the following countries:
      Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Bahrain, Comoros, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Madagascar, Mauritania, Morocco, Pakistan, Russian Federation, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, ​Tunisia, Yemen and Zimbabwe."

(Note, no mention of China on that list - only way around it would be if the Chinese passport was a diplomatic passport.)
Last editedby ChrisCh at Aug 28, 2018, 12:04 PM.

Snail

Member since 16 Jan 2018

Total posts 16

Check-in staff were correct: passport holders from the PRC require a transit visa to transit Australia, even if not leaving the international transit area or 'entering' Australia.

Passport holders from many other countries are exempted from getting a transit visa, but the PRC is not one of them. See here for more details.

I see. Thanks Chris.

hutch

Member since 07 Oct 2012

Total posts 743

Check-in staff were correct: passport holders from the PRC require a transit visa to transit Australia, even if not leaving the international transit area or 'entering' Australia.

Passport holders from many other countries are exempted from getting a transit visa, but the PRC is not one of them. See here for more details.

I see. Thanks Chris.

Like Chris said, they were quite correct. Having said that, given how much people travel these days, it shouldn't be necessary to obtain a transit visa if you aren't going through passport control. Just my 2 cents.

dimi

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

Member since 13 Jul 2012

Total posts 139

Check-in staff were correct: passport holders from the PRC require a transit visa to transit Australia, even if not leaving the international transit area or 'entering' Australia.

Passport holders from many other countries are exempted from getting a transit visa, but the PRC is not one of them. See here for more details.


I see. Thanks Chris.


Like Chris said, they were quite correct. Having said that, given how much people travel these days, it shouldn't be necessary to obtain a transit visa if you aren't going through passport control. Just my 2 cents.

There is a big different between "Should" and "Is"


The reason why visa is required:

Given how much people travel these days, it is not uncommon for passengers' travel plans to go awry.

Planes arrive late, connections get missed.

If a passenger has to stay in Australia overnight when an airlines screws up, they are not allowed to be marooned in the airport Transit Area.

Australian immigration will issue overnight visas so that passengers with missed connections can enter Australia.

Unfortunately they cannot do so for citizens of countries that are not explicitly specified on the visa-exemption list.

Last editedby dimi at Aug 28, 2018, 07:14 PM.

MRYJDrake

Air New Zealand - Airpoints

Member since 31 Oct 2016

Total posts 190

There is a big different between "Should" and "Is"


The reason why visa is required:

Given how much people travel these days, it is not uncommon for passengers' travel plans to go awry.

Planes arrive late, connections get missed.

If a passenger has to stay in Australia overnight when an airlines screws up, they are not allowed to be marooned in the airport Transit Area.

Australian immigration will issue overnight visas so that passengers with missed connections can enter Australia.

Unfortunately they cannot do so for citizens of countries that are not explicitly specified on the visa-exemption list.

Last edited by dimi at Aug 28, 2018, 07.14 PM.
That makes a lot of sense.

Here's hoping nothing goes so awry things end up akin to the plot of the movie The Terminal.

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