Switching allegiances?

11 replies

sakerrison

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

Member since 10 Jun 2017

Total posts 6

Hi all

Looking to see what the collective wisdom can do to guide my thinking.

I've recently relocated from Melbourne/Sydney, Australia to Oslo, Norway indefinitely. After having finished working in Australia in October last year, the chances of keeping my Velocity Gold (expiring early June) are slim to none. So, what to do?

I currently also have Qantas Silver which doesn't expire for a little longer (end of August) along with Qantas Club (December 2020).

I have a likely trip to North America in July (including some internal flights there), which would be enough to keep Silver with Qantas (clearly too late for Velocity, though). And I will probably have a trip to Asia or perhaps as far back as Australia at the end of the year. So I could just stay with Qantas, fly with Oneworld partners, and use QC membership for lounge access where available if I'm not otherwise flying business.


I'm expecting a couple of long international flights each year is probably likely for the next few years as well, usually in business; and hopefully a few more local trips in Europe as well. Unfortunately my current job doesn't involve any flying.


So the alternatives that I'm currently thrashing around are:


Do I stay within Oneworld, but say switch to AA? Perhaps take a run at a challenge to Oneworld Sapphire.


Or switch allegiance to Star Alliance, and say look at United's match / challenge (the local SAS doesn't seem to have any such options, although I could of course use any resulting Star Alliance status otherwise when flying SAS). The lack of domestic lounge access in the US would be a bit of a shame (being at the airport early before a flight is completely fine by me when I can sit around in the lounge), but I guess I could fork out for a daypass.


Appreciate any insights and experience others may have.

Scott

mviy

Member since 05 May 2016

Total posts 279

QC Membership is much more restrictive on when you can access a lounge than having QF Gold status.

Switching to another airline’s FF program may well be best for you.
Last editedby mviy at Mar 23, 2019, 04:07 PM.

jch

Virgin Australia - Velocity Rewards

Member since 15 Nov 2017

Total posts 143

You could credit Delta for America and Singapore for Asia to keep your Velocity going
Last editedby jch at Mar 23, 2019, 11:53 PM.

Red Cee

Member since 15 Feb 2018

Total posts 151

Will you ever return to Australia? That could be important for your thinking.

sakerrison

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

Member since 10 Jun 2017

Total posts 6

You could credit Delta for America and Singapore for Asia to keep your Velocity going
Last edited by jch at Mar 23, 2019, 11.53 PM.
True, and my last flight to the US was with Delta (a little over a year now) and my move to Norway was booked via Singapore (albeit with points, most of which were transferred from Velocity or AMEX). Unfortunately, for the upcoming trips this year, they're not until after my Velocity Gold expires.

sakerrison

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

Member since 10 Jun 2017

Total posts 6

Will you ever return to Australia? That could be important for your thinking.

Maybe one day (my parents and siblings are still in Australia), but the current plan is to be here for at least the next 3 years without otherwise having put a fixed date on things.

Ourmanin

Singapore Airlines - KrisFlyer

Member since 08 Jun 2018

Total posts 110

There are a number of factors to consider. However unless you were planning regular return trips to Australia I would imagine that alternative schemes may be sensible. Personally I’d start by considering where you’d be looking to fly to most often. Unless you are wedded to a scheme and assuming you’re using your money for the flights. If flying long haul business class I’d suggest your only frame of reference should be the best fare (obviously factoring in product / routing) rather than being a slave to any one scheme. Not sure your Qantas Club card will have much value. But may be worth considering priority pass as an option if you want lounge access. If you do pick a scheme just make sure your likely flying meets the requirements without needing to do any flights just to retain status (for example BA silver - equivalent to QF gold status - requires 4 flights on BA metal, irrespective of number of credits you’ve accumulated from other oneworld carriers)

adethyasjce

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

Member since 03 Jul 2018

Total posts 66

If you are considering to go w/ *A, then you could look at Turkish/Aegan airlines, which offer much lesser requirements to get *AG - this could be the incentive you may be looking for. Sometimes when taking a decision I tend to think ;

1. By staying where I'm - what do I get and lose?
2. By switching - what do I get and lose?
3. What's less damaging (in terms of status, points etc)

Also, I'd think, given that *A has good network in Europe - you could get more points and status quickly even if you fly not so much .

For example, a return J from SYD - DXB on TK will give you around 35K - 40K miles for roughly around AU$3200-3500, which will skyrocket you to *AG for 2 years. You could then use this status to visit home or trips internal to Europe etc

sakerrison

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

Member since 10 Jun 2017

Total posts 6

There are a number of factors to consider. However unless you were planning regular return trips to Australia I would imagine that alternative schemes may be sensible. Personally I’d start by considering where you’d be looking to fly to most often. Unless you are wedded to a scheme and assuming you’re using your money for the flights. If flying long haul business class I’d suggest your only frame of reference should be the best fare (obviously factoring in product / routing) rather than being a slave to any one scheme. Not sure your Qantas Club card will have much value. But may be worth considering priority pass as an option if you want lounge access. If you do pick a scheme just make sure your likely flying meets the requirements without needing to do any flights just to retain status (for example BA silver - equivalent to QF gold status - requires 4 flights on BA metal, irrespective of number of credits you’ve accumulated from other oneworld carriers)

Thanks. Barring emergencies, I imagine no more than an annual trip to Australia. It's not necessarily the best answer, but at least BA do fly to Oslo, and I have take a Heathrow-Oslo route at least a couple of times.

sakerrison

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

Member since 10 Jun 2017

Total posts 6

If you are considering to go w/ *A, then you could look at Turkish/Aegan airlines, which offer much lesser requirements to get *AG - this could be the incentive you may be looking for. Sometimes when taking a decision I tend to think ;

1. By staying where I'm - what do I get and lose?
2. By switching - what do I get and lose?
3. What's less damaging (in terms of status, points etc)

Also, I'd think, given that *A has good network in Europe - you could get more points and status quickly even if you fly not so much .

For example, a return J from SYD - DXB on TK will give you around 35K - 40K miles for roughly around AU$3200-3500, which will skyrocket you to *AG for 2 years. You could then use this status to visit home or trips internal to Europe etc

I do see those Turkish or Aegean ones pop up from time to time on FF program lists, but have never looked too closely at them. Perhaps it's time I look closer. Thanks for your thoughts.

adethyasjce

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

Member since 03 Jul 2018

Total posts 66

If you are considering to go w/ *A, then you could look at Turkish/Aegan airlines, which offer much lesser requirements to get *AG - this could be the incentive you may be looking for. Sometimes when taking a decision I tend to think ;

1. By staying where I'm - what do I get and lose?
2. By switching - what do I get and lose?
3. What's less damaging (in terms of status, points etc)

Also, I'd think, given that *A has good network in Europe - you could get more points and status quickly even if you fly not so much .

For example, a return J from SYD - DXB on TK will give you around 35K - 40K miles for roughly around AU$3200-3500, which will skyrocket you to *AG for 2 years. You could then use this status to visit home or trips internal to Europe etc

I do see those Turkish or Aegean ones pop up from time to time on FF program lists, but have never looked too closely at them. Perhaps it's time I look closer. Thanks for your thoughts.

You’re welcome. Good luck. Let this community how you go. Cheers

sakerrison

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

Member since 10 Jun 2017

Total posts 6

If you are considering to go w/ *A, then you could look at Turkish/Aegan airlines, which offer much lesser requirements to get *AG - this could be the incentive you may be looking for. Sometimes when taking a decision I tend to think ;

1. By staying where I'm - what do I get and lose?
2. By switching - what do I get and lose?
3. What's less damaging (in terms of status, points etc)

Also, I'd think, given that *A has good network in Europe - you could get more points and status quickly even if you fly not so much .

For example, a return J from SYD - DXB on TK will give you around 35K - 40K miles for roughly around AU$3200-3500, which will skyrocket you to *AG for 2 years. You could then use this status to visit home or trips internal to Europe etc

I do see those Turkish or Aegean ones pop up from time to time on FF program lists, but have never looked too closely at them. Perhaps it's time I look closer. Thanks for your thoughts.

You’re welcome. Good luck. Let this community how you go. Cheers

I have ended up going with SAS. I'm figuring being the local carrier that it should be as good as any, and will be easiest to earn extra points from regular spending as well.

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