Flight socks in business class

10 replies

Buzzfuzz

Etihad - Etihad Guest

Member since 09 Jun 2019

Total posts 5

Is it still desirable to wear compression stockings (flight socks) in business class when fully flat beds are available?

Chris Chamberlin

Member since 24 Apr 2012

Total posts 1,055

Moved from 'website feedback' to General Travel News & Discussion.

Racala

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

Member since 22 May 2018

Total posts 29

My medical people say yes. I scored some "freebees" following hip surgery last month. Discharging doc made sure that they were packed into my bag..with verbal instruction of wear them on your next o/s flight!

s4172249

Jetstar Airways - Qantas Frequent Flyer

Member since 18 Feb 2018

Total posts 30

Yes it’s still worthwhile wearing them, as it’s not sitting upright in economy class or a lack of legroom that is a risk factor for DVT, but rather prolonged immobility in any position, recumbent or not. Hospitalised patients are in “fully lie flat” beds too and get DVTs at rates far higher than the background populace (albeit with some other concomitant risk factors too such as acute medical illness, surgery etc).

Metoo

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

Member since 25 Nov 2016

Total posts 90

I know my feet and legs feel better for wearing them. There's plenty available online.

tonyw

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

Member since 18 Jul 2015

Total posts 16

With a doctor's letter, you may get your health fund to contribute

Ian_from_HKG

CX

Member since 05 Jun 2012

Total posts 53

It depends also on your risk profile and length of flight, and what you will be doing (eg being active or sedentary) before and after the flight. For example, the Memsahib is high-risk because she has had a previous DVT - I therefore won't let her fly long-haul unless with a flat bed BUT she also takes low-dose aspirin for a period before and after the flight and wears compression socks (for shorter flights) or stockings (which go up her thighs as well) for longer flights AND she regularly gets up to walk around, hydrates plentifully and so forth. One thing to bear in mind is that very fit people can be (counter-intuitively) higher risk, because their resting pulse is generally lower, increasing the possibility of blood pooling and clotting.

If you are are concerned about DVT, consult your GP who can do a clotting test and give you an assessment of your risk levels.

Having said all that, wearing compression socks is never going to hurt you (although they can be a bit hot and itchy). They can also reduce the tendency of feet and ankles to swell on long flights - how many of us have struggled to put our shoes back on at the end of a long-haul flight??!

Buzzfuzz

Etihad - Etihad Guest

Member since 09 Jun 2019

Total posts 5

I agree. It may be a bit of a struggle to get them on, but once they are on, you don't notice them and they may just be doing you some real good.

Madhatter49

Virgin Australia - Velocity Rewards

Member since 11 Dec 2016

Total posts 58

Originally Posted by Ian_from_HKG

It depends also on your risk profile and length of flight, and what you will be doing (eg being active or sedentary) before and after the flight. For example, the Memsahib is high-risk because she has had a previous DVT - I therefore won't let her fly long-haul unless with a flat bed BUT she also takes low-dose aspirin for a period before and after the flight and wears compression socks (for shorter flights) or stockings (which go up her thighs as well) for longer flights AND she regularly gets up to walk around, hydrates plentifully and so forth. One thing to bear in mind is that very fit people can be (counter-intuitively) higher risk, because their resting pulse is generally lower, increasing the possibility of blood pooling and clotting.

If you are are concerned about DVT, consult your GP who can do a clotting test and give you an assessment of your risk levels.

Having said all that, wearing compression socks is never going to hurt you (although they can be a bit hot and itchy). They can also reduce the tendency of feet and ankles to swell on long flights - how many of us have struggled to put our shoes back on at the end of a long-haul flight??!

Fantastic to read this. Showing it to my wife. Basically saying that getting fat in older age is actually healthier for us.

Thanks for letting us know.

Stephen D

Virgin Australia - Velocity Rewards

Member since 12 Nov 2017

Total posts 42

Following ankle surgery, I was advised to wear them by my specialist. I was also advised to take asprin (Encartia) a day or two before the flight and afterwards to avoid DVT. As I have had ankle issue, I do wear them on long haul flights, especially if overnight.

patrickk

Qantas

Member since 19 Apr 2012

Total posts 402

I used them for the first time and after wrestling them on they are great. Superficial bruising around shins (old age) vanished

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