How to use Qantas' points, status credits calculators

It’s easy to check how many Qantas Points and status credits you’ll earn in the air, and how many you’d need to fly or upgrade.

By Chris Chamberlin, December 1 2020
How to use Qantas' points, status credits calculators

Whether you’re curious about how many Qantas Points a flight could earn – or just want to know if your travel plans will keep your Gold or Platinum card in-check – Qantas’ points calculator is simple, yet powerful.

Not only can you search these figures for Qantas’ own flights, you can check the numbers for many partner airline routes and codeshare journeys as well.

Once you’ve saved up a nice stash of reward points, the same calculator displays how many of those points you’d require to book your next adventure: again, whether that’s with Qantas, or one of its many partner airlines for when international travel restrictions ease.

If you’ve already booked a Qantas flight, you can also check how many Qantas Points a business class upgrade would set you back: and using the Roo’s calculator is incredibly straightforward.

Calculate how many Qantas Points, status credits you can earn

Checking the potential rewards of any given flight using Qantas’ frequent flyer calculator is as easy as clicking where you’re flying from, and where you’re headed:

As part of the search, you can also select the type of fare you’re planning to book, but here’s a tip: if you set this to ‘Discount Economy’, you’ll see all of the possible earning rates for your chosen route on the results page.

(Other rates, including for business class, are shown on the results page when you scroll down.)
(Other rates, including for business class, are shown on the results page when you scroll down.)

If you select a higher category, like ‘Flexible Economy’, you won’t be shown any of the lower-tiered earning rates, like Discount Economy, which makes it harder to compare all your options.

After entering a route, you’ll also get the option to choose which airline’s flight code you’d like to look up.

For example, on the popular Sydney-Melbourne corridor, Qantas Frequent Flyer members can earn Qantas Points and status credits on eligible Jetstar fares too, and you can explore those rates by changing the airline to “Jetstar Airways (JQ)”.

(Jetstar domestic flights don’t earn Qantas Points and status credits by default, but these become available when you purchase an add-on that bundles these as part of the package.)

By logging into your Qantas Frequent Flyer account, or selecting your frequent flyer tier near the top of the results area, the numbers you’ll see will be tailored to include any applicable ‘status bonus’, too.

Although the status bonus makes no difference on short routes like Sydney-Melbourne – where the separate ‘minimum points guarantee’ instead comes into play – on longer journeys such as Brisbane to Perth, the change is more noticeable.

For example, the figures above show the rewards available to Qantas Platinum members, inclusive of that status bonus, which you can compare to the rewards earned by a Bronze member, below.

You can follow this same process for international flights too, including those operated by Qantas’ many partner airlines – both under the partner airline’s flight number, and a Qantas codeshare.

Take Perth-Hong Kong for instance, a route operated by Qantas’ Oneworld alliance partner Cathay Pacific, on which Qantas also codeshares.

Booking a business class flight through Qantas on a QF flight number would deliver a solid return of over 13,000 Qantas Points for a Platinum-grade frequent flyer, plus 125-135 status credits per one-way flight:

Make that same booking on the Cathay Pacific CX flight number instead, and the reward is far less significant: a flat 4,700 Qantas Points on all business class fares, plus 120 status credits on the same.

For a Platinum frequent flyer, the hefty difference in frequent flyer points reflects the fact that the Qantas ‘status bonus’ doesn’t apply on flights marketed by Cathay Pacific (CX) – only on flights booked under a Qantas (QF) flight number.

As you explore your options, you may also find flights or airlines with which you’d only earn Qantas Points but no status credits, such as Emirates.

This is where booking a Qantas QF flight number has its advantages, but sometimes, this option can come at a significantly higher price than booking via the partner airline. By using the calculator, you’ll be able to decide whether the extra Qantas Points and status credits are worth it.

Also read: How codeshare flights could be costing you thousands

Calculate how many Qantas Points you need for a flight

Checking to see how many Qantas Points you’ll need to book a flight follows the same steps above, except that you’ll select “use points” at the top of the page, rather than plugging your flight into the “earn points” tab, which sits open by default.

But unlike the ‘earning points’ option, the travel class you select as part of your search is the only one you’ll see.

As such, if you select 'economy', you'll see economy. Similarly, if you select 'business', you'll get business class.

Although many Jetstar routes are absent from this tool, including that popular Sydney-Melbourne trek, you can search for many partner airline flights here too.

The results you’ll see right now may be skewed by reward seat availability – as searching ‘Sydney to Singapore’ doesn’t display the rates you’d normally need for a Qantas or BA non-stop flight, instead showing Cathay Pacific via Hong Kong, as those non-stop flights are currently paused:

While connections like the one suggested may pop up on occasion, the tool is normally geared towards ‘point to point’ journeys only, so doesn’t normally calculate one-stop routes like Sydney to London via Dubai on Emirates, via Doha on Qatar Airways, and so on.

Where available, you’ll still see those reward options when attempting to make a booking: you just won’t find them in this calculator, at least, for the time being.

Calculate how many Qantas Points you need for an upgrade

Now that you’re familiar with calculating how many points you can earn on a flight, and how many you’d need to spend to book the same, checking the rates for a points-based upgrade is a piece of cake.

Again, click in your flight details, select the type of upgrade you’re looking for – such from discount economy (to business class) – and you’ll see that magic figure, along with an outline of the benefits of your upgrade:

Be aware that the cabin images you see via this tool don’t necessarily match the experience you’ll have on board: so don’t be confused into thinking you’ll find a fully-flat bed waiting for you, just because you see one pictured here.

For instance, the image shown when searching 'Sydney-Melbourne' is of business class aboard a Qantas Boeing 787, which the airline would normally operate on longer international flights.

Between Sydney and Melbourne, however, you’ll most likely find a Boeing 737 pulling up at the gate, which does still offer a business class cabin, but with reclining seats – not flatbeds.

Also read: Oneworld moves forward with alliance-wide upgrades

Chris Chamberlin

Chris Chamberlin is the Associate Editor of Executive Traveller, and lives by the motto that a journey of a thousand miles begins not just with a single step, but also a strong latte, a theatre ticket, and later in the day, a good gin and tonic.

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

18 May 2011

Total posts 232

I preferred the old calculator that let you string together several legs of a journey

Wes
Wes

01 Dec 2020

Total posts 1

I am unable to use this method to determine the points that are required for some future trips planned because Qantas is currently not flying there. Like Melbourne to Chicago. Is there another way to determine the points required for an award flight on flights that have not yet restarted

wes

break it up

MEL/LAX (qantas)

LAX/ORD (american)

or

MEL/YVR(Vancouver on Qantas, which was seasonal)

YVR/ORD (WESTJET)

Any other way I think would require 2 stops.

EG. MEL/NAN(Fiji - Fiji Air)

NAN/SFO (Fiji Air)

SFO/ORD (American)

MEL/NAN & NAN/SFO (or LAX) only connected in past few days a week, but there are worst things, that a few days in Fiji to unwind.


Hi Guest, join in the discussion on How to use Qantas' points, status credits calculators