Not so much a question, as an observation.

16 replies

drgmarshall

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

Member since 10 May 2012

Total posts 106

Not so much a question, as an observation. I've flown the Qantas A380 in First a good few times now. For some reason, when the seat is made into the bed (very comfy), there is a large gap or void behind the bed - so it effectively becomes a bed without a headboard; and as a consequence, one's pillows are constantly falling into the hole. I've taken to sleeping the "wrong" way round on the Qantas First bed which has two big benefits; 1) It solves the pillow disappearing act; and 2) for a tall person (6' 3"), it actually makes the bed a little longer since my feet now extend into the void at the top end of the bed. Just a tip some folks might find useful.

aklrunway

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

Member since 09 May 2011

Total posts 172

You probably shouldn't do that as the oxygen mask would be above where your head is supposed to be, therefore in a decompression you would not have easy access to it if you are sleeping the wrong way...

Serg

QFF

Member since 12 Apr 2013

Total posts 870

If you prepared to die each time when you fly, you should not fly at all. Neither you should drive. Or ride. Or even walk. Best solution is lie and die.

aklrunway

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

Member since 09 May 2011

Total posts 172

So you don't wear your seatbelt when you drive then? What a stupid response

Serg

QFF

Member since 12 Apr 2013

Total posts 870

Seatbelt is protection from small collisions while oxygen mask is last emergency resort. If it would be rapid decompression your chances laying this or that way will be the same – you better to seat. So you may argue that best way is to buy First and spend 14 hours seating upright. And skip meal because having something in front of you decrease your chances of survival upon impact. Most likely scenario that something happens like severe turbulence before masks will deployed, so you will be seated anyway.

aklrunway

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

Member since 09 May 2011

Total posts 172

If the aircraft experiences a slow, gradual decompression the oxygen masks will drop and the pilot will take evasive action to get the aircraft to a safe altitude. Severe turbulence isn't a cause for oxygen masks to drop. Laying the incorrect way will prevent the passenger from obtaining the oxygen mask which is vital in a decompression.

Serg

QFF

Member since 12 Apr 2013

Total posts 870

Slow gradual decompression will not trigger masks, only pilots will – they will have alarm before any passengers. If slow decompression occurs pilots will descend immediately. People can survive at Everest attitude and even do hard physical work. One has to be 5-10 min at 10km to pass out and (if not descend) eventually die. It will never happen - in such circumstances pilots take invasion action immediately. And if pilots pass out masks will not save you anyway :-).

No-one yet proves that masks save lives. Not even aircraft seatbelts for this merit - in case of impact forces are so great that you will be smashed anyway. Heck - even in car accident having belts AND bags not 100% fatality prevention. Belts in aircraft design to prevent injuries at severe turbulence and masks design "just in case". I am with OP and rather choose comfort; particularly considering that front passengers (where First and business usually resides) have minimal chances of survival upon accident anyway.

aklrunway

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

Member since 09 May 2011

Total posts 172

Oxygen masks are AUTOMATICALLY deployed when the cabin reaches a certain altitude. The pilots are not responsible for deploying them. They are able to if they wish but they have no need to as the aircraft will do this for them.

Also, if you were at 10km (like you say - not that km is used when discussing altitude that aircraft are flying), this is approx 32,000ft which means your current level of consciousness will last approx 30-60 seconds

Hugo

Member since 12 Jun 2013

Total posts 216

Good, so we've established that if the mask comes down while you're sleeping the wrong way around, you'll remain conscious for long enough to figure out a way to grab it. Moving on...

Serg

QFF

Member since 12 Apr 2013

Total posts 870

Hilarious, but definitely useful tip for some. Personally I decided when I would fly next time in business with BA to take with me inflatable camping mattress – in bed mode seats flat and spacious, but because of constructed from few separate peaces not really soft enough for comfy sleep. In First they issue duvet and it makes quite a difference even considering that duvet is thin. Now I am quite excited to test my theory with mattress :-))))

paa

Member since 21 Dec 2012

Total posts 43

Brilliant idea Serg. I hope you report back to us how this experiment goes. Go for a good self infatling mattress - with the lower cabin pressure it will be awesome!

For extra fun try this on LHR to US flight, and you might get to practise your wrestling skills with an air marshall.

watson374

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

Member since 17 Aug 2012

Total posts 1,285

Get a Thermarest. They work brilliantly like this. Inflate them right as the seat belt sign goes off to maximise inflation.

Serg

QFF

Member since 12 Apr 2013

Total posts 870

Exactly! I talking about those hiking close cells mattress that small enough to pack into carry on, yet comfy enough to sleep even on the ground.

Joshb

Qantas - QFF Platinum

Member since 20 Mar 2012

Total posts 122

Thats a bit genius drgmarshall, tell me did the crew have any qualms with this? Also as it slightly narrows at the foot rest did you find any restrictions in shoulder room?

drgmarshall

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

Member since 10 May 2012

Total posts 106

Joshb, I'm a pretty big bloke and the space in the footwell is more than adequate for me across the shoulders.  I'm not squashed-up at all. In fact, it actually feels a little more private and nicer for it.  For other readers who've raised "safety" issues, it is perfectly possible to continue to wear the single strap seat belt around your middle; which I do when sleeping.  I've used this method on 3 QF A380 flights now and although the Cabin Staff have asked me about it when I've woken up, none have ever said it's not allowable.  Lastly, as the QF First seat is actually comprised of the main seat and a second "visitor" seat, below the TV, I'd imagine that the oxygen mask would still be immediately accessible if one was to sit up from a prone position when sleeping. So I have no worries about this at all.

Hi Guest, join in the discussion on Not so much a question, as an observation.

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