COVID-19 vaccine - paid options

83 replies

Tracie

Virgin Australia - Velocity Rewards

Member since 30 Oct 2015

Total posts 91

Anone have any insight into opportunities for paying for the COVID-19 vaccine?

Can't wait for ScoMo to get his act together to get it rolled out in Australia.

Grannular

Member since 31 Mar 2014

Total posts 214

I can't imagine there are spares available for sale. Governments around the world have already pre-purchased anything and everything available for current and future production. As for ScoMo getting his act together, what more would you like him to do? There is only a finite capacity to produce a vaccine. Are you also more important than the people who maybe ahead of you in the queue to receive a vaccine? If you have health issues, then I would expect you to already be ahead in the queue

KW72

Member since 17 Jun 2020

Total posts 29

Given how many people in Australia have no desire to travel and want to stay behind closed borders forever (particularly in QLD and WA), they should go to the back of the queue. Irrespective of their age etc.

Those reliant on travel for their business or to connect with their families should be prioritized, and if needed pay to get the vaccine. This will ensure a quicker and more efficient economic recovery.

Grannular

Member since 31 Mar 2014

Total posts 214

Originally Posted by KW72

Given how many people in Australia have no desire to travel and want to stay behind closed borders forever (particularly in QLD and WA), they should go to the back of the queue. Irrespective of their age etc.

Those reliant on travel for their business or to connect with their families should be prioritized, and if needed pay to get the vaccine. This will ensure a quicker and more efficient economic recovery.

Ah yes. Lets punish the population of an entire state because of the decisions of their state government

andyf

Virgin Australia - Velocity Rewards

Member since 07 Dec 2014

Total posts 50

No vaccine has been approved for use in Australia. So no, you can't pay for it and just get it. Also, I would be highly surprised if it was ScoMo (as opposed to the regulator the TGA) making the decision.

I also doubt that even when its approved that a private citizen will be able to pay to jump the queue - the vaccine production will likely be monopolised by the Government, and rolled out on a basis it decides ... but that is yet to be seen.

Last editedby andyf at Dec 18, 2020, 10:11 PM.

Greg E

Member since 26 Sep 2020

Total posts 19

I assume there will be exceptions for exceptional circumstances but given we are dealing with a deadly pandemic that can cause massive economic damage if it is let go, wanting to visit your family OS just won't make it.

Rita Cavanagh

Member since 01 Dec 2011

Total posts 10

Even if you can pay for it, should you? As others have said, it's unlikely anyway as there are limited supplies.

davidlec

Etihad - Etihad Guest

Member since 14 Jun 2019

Total posts 3

The point is to get the most bang for buck.

But what is the "bang"? There I would say there are three "bangs".

One is to reduce transmission, and the other is to reduce deaths and the third is to reduce ICUs needed.

Prioritising transmission means vaccinating those who work with the infected or very highly infected. Right now that means vaccinating health care workers including those involved with tracing, quarantining, hospitals and nursing homes.

This should be happening now. The sooner vaccinations start the sooner we can start saving lives.

Then, we should start vaccinating the elderly, 70+ and the not quite so elderly (say 65+) with heart issues. This will save a large number of people without requiring a large number of vaccinations.

This process should continue until we get down to people in the sub 50 years old range.

Below 50 years of age, the death rate isn't high. We need to vaccinate them to stop transmission, not to save their lives (in a direct sense).

But that is where the transmission rate problem arises again.

As part of our economic recovery, business people, engineers, trade diplomats, embassy staff, etc, will need to get on planes and fly overseas.

We don't want them going overseas getting infected and returning. So, maybe they need some kind of prioritisation. And to avoid it becoming some kind of loophole way of jumping the queue some kind of fee might be appropriate to ensure only those with genuine needs will use this loophole, or at least some kind of barrier.

I am 67 with a heart issue so I already qualify for an early vaccine.

I am supposed to be in the USA in September to set up a sales office there. This requires a full Business visa, not a standard 90 day tourist visa.

So, assuming that health care workers and the over 50 are vaccinated, possibly someone with proof of a business visa, and appropriate documentation can request a shot 6 weeks before departure and their booster 2 weeks before departure, and a negative COVID test a week before departure.


Rotten

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

Member since 21 Jul 2018

Total posts 6

Well KW72, It appears that you may well be one of those Stupid Selfish Sydneysiders who support the idiots in power in NSW who allowed the Ruby Princess passengers to disperse this scourge throughout the nation in the first place. The courageous and well supported actions of the Queensland government (confirmed by their resounding election victory last year) have maintained Qld as the "safe state" where we have been able to maintain a normalcy of life through this. In the meantime I for one am keen to resume my annual travel to Canada and Europe, along with my international house guest who has been (happily) trapped here with ever increasing Visa costs while other idiots continue to deny the medical facts and spread the virus far and wide.

j13

Member since 13 Jan 2021

Total posts 5

I received the Moderna vaccine in the US last year and applied to the Australian government for reduced/home quarantine or no quarantine. My application was rejected and their response was, there will be no changes to hotel quarantine unless the vaccine is proven to prevent asymptomatic cases. Initial data suggest Moderna vaccine reduced asymptomatic cases by 62% after first injection. Moderna are doing further studies to determine asymptomatic reductions after second injection. The $64 question is does the Australian government want 100% reduction. If so, it is highly likely any vaccine will give that result. Are we chasing the impossible dream - elimination.

John Phelan

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

Member since 28 Oct 2011

Total posts 237

There will be sufficient vaccines for all Australians who want one. The federal Health Department has a roll-out schedule and expects everyone who wants the vaccination will be able to be done by the end of October this year.

Grannular

Member since 31 Mar 2014

Total posts 214

Originally Posted by j13

I received the Moderna vaccine in the US last year and applied to the Australian government for reduced/home quarantine or no quarantine. My application was rejected and their response was, there will be no changes to hotel quarantine unless the vaccine is proven to prevent asymptomatic cases. Initial data suggest Moderna vaccine reduced asymptomatic cases by 62% after first injection. Moderna are doing further studies to determine asymptomatic reductions after second injection. The $64 question is does the Australian government want 100% reduction. If so, it is highly likely any vaccine will give that result. Are we chasing the impossible dream - elimination.

The vaccine reduces symptoms. Not the carriage of the virus. I think a lot of people have missed the point. The vaccine doesn't eliminate the virus. Someone who has been vaccinated, is still a carrier and speads the virus.

h15t0r1an

Member since 29 Jan 2015

Total posts 12

We still don't know if the vaccines prevent transmission by the vaccinated person even if they don't have symptoms themselves

h15t0r1an

Member since 29 Jan 2015

Total posts 12

We still don't know if the vaccines prevent transmission by the vaccinated person even if they don't have symptoms themselves

Greg E

Member since 26 Sep 2020

Total posts 19

Originally Posted by John Phelan

There will be sufficient vaccines for all Australians who want one. The federal Health Department has a roll-out schedule and expects everyone who wants the vaccination will be able to be done by the end of October this year.

and it will be based on need, not who can pay for it. As it should be.

Hi Guest, join in the discussion on COVID-19 vaccine - paid options

Attach Files