Review: Qantas Finnair A330 business class, Sydney-Singapore

What’s it like to fly in the unique non-reclining ‘AirLounge’ business class seat?

By David Flynn, February 7 2024
Review: Qantas Finnair A330 business class, Sydney-Singapore

Many Qantas business class travellers jetting between Sydney and Singapore are set for a very different experience over the next few years, with almost half the flights on this busy route being made on a leased Finnair A330 fitted with the airline’s unique non-reclining ‘AirLounge’ seats.

That’ll also apply to all Qantas’ Sydney-Bangkok flights from March 31 2024.

The reason for this switch-up? To combat a shortfall of aircraft that’s bedevilled the entire industry, Qantas is leasing a pair of Finnair A330s in order to free up its own aircraft and crew to boost flying elsewhere.

These Finnair A330s will become a familiar sight at Sydney Airport.
These Finnair A330s will become a familiar sight at Sydney Airport.

(Finnair itself has less need for these planes as the current Russian-Ukraine conflict means its flight paths must avoid Russian airspace, stretching some routes beyond the A330’s range.)

This lease period stretches as far as 2028, when Qantas will have begun replacing the A330s with a mix of Airbus A350s and Boeing 787s.

Between now and then, that’s a lot of flights to Singapore and Bangkok in these Finnair jets with Finnair business class.

So what can business class travellers expect on these Qantas-Finnair A330s?

I snared up a Sydney-Singapore business class seat at low Classic Flight Reward rates – just 68,400 Qantas Points each way (plus $233 in taxes and surcharges) – to bring you this first-hand report.

Thew new Qantas A330 business class experience between Sydney and Singapore.
Thew new Qantas A330 business class experience between Sydney and Singapore.

My snap summary: this is a seat travellers either love or loathe, with very little middle ground.

Most people who’ve flown in Finnair’s latest business class tend to have very positive reactions, including praise as the best non-doored business class.

But when the pendulum of opinion swings the other way, the shift is into ‘uncomfortable, never fly again’ territory.

If you find yourself in that camp on Qantas’ Sydney-Singapore Finnair A330 flights, at least you can opt for the Qantas A380.

The Qantas-Finnair A330 ‘wet lease'

It’s a decidedly odd feeling – walking up to a boarding gate at Sydney Airport holding a Qantas ticket, yet stepping onto a Finnair jet and being welcomed by a Finnair crew.

The Qantas flights are staffed by Finnair pilots and crew.
The Qantas flights are staffed by Finnair pilots and crew.

This Twilight Zone vibe isn’t helped when confronted with Finnair’s AirLounge business class pods instead of the familiar Qantas Business Suite.

The Finnair A330 business class cabin.
The Finnair A330 business class cabin.

But it’s not really a Finnair flight: the bedding is standard Qantas-issue (alas, none of those delightful Marimekko throws and pillows), as are the amenity kits and catering.

The noise-cancelling headphones are from Qantas, washroom amenities from Finnair, and inflight entertainment is a mix of both – the Qantas content sits behind Finnair’s user interface.

The window seats in the Qantas Finnair A330 business class cabin.
The window seats in the Qantas Finnair A330 business class cabin.

In airline circles this arrangement is termed a ‘wet lease’ and it will run until late 2025, before being converted to a ‘dry lease’ which will see Qantas pilots and cabin crew take over through to late 2028.

Note that there’s no change to earning Qantas Points and status credits on these ‘operated by Finnair’ flights, and you can still book points-based reward seats and use points for upgrades from economy to premium economy or business class.

Finnair’s A330 business class 

For those who’ve not travelled in Finnair’s latest business class, such as on Airbus A350 flights from Singapore, Bangkok and Hong Kong to Helsinki, this cabin full of 28 oversized ‘sofa’ seats wrapped in high-walled shells invites a double-take.

The Finnair A330 business class cabin.
The Finnair A330 business class cabin.

Decked out in Finnair’s dark ‘Nordic blue’, the entire padded inside of this curved shell serves as your seat – and it’s a seat that’s fixed in place.

Finnair's radical non-reclining AirLounge business class.
Finnair's radical non-reclining AirLounge business class.

It doesn’t recline into sundeck-style mode, let alone to become a bed. It doesn’t recline at all. Thankfully, this doesn’t mean you have to sit bolt upright for the whole flight.

Finnair's radical non-reclining AirLounge business class.
Finnair's radical non-reclining AirLounge business class.

One corner of the AirLounge’s front shell, off to the side of 18” video screen, contains an alcove for your feet.

When it’s time to sleep, two padded panels swing up between the seat and ottoman to create a continuous space which becomes your fully-flat bed.

How the Finnair A330 business class goes from sofa to bed.
How the Finnair A330 business class goes from sofa to bed.

Developed by Finnair, seat-maker Collins Aerospace and the design doyens at Tangerine, from an original design by PriestmanGoode for British Airways in 2014, the AirLounge is like nothing you’ve ever seen – except perhaps for your favourite couch at home.

Finnair's AirLounge business class began life as this ambitious concept created a decade ago for British Airways.
Finnair's AirLounge business class began life as this ambitious concept created a decade ago for British Airways.

And that’s the thinking behind the AirLounge: if you can comfortably laze on your couch for hours on end, why not bring that concept into the sky as a one-person couch where passengers can sit, sleep or otherwise spread out as they choose?

Finnair's AirLounge business class is less a seat and more a 'sofa in the sky'.
Finnair's AirLounge business class is less a seat and more a 'sofa in the sky'.

(Of course it’s not just about the passenger. The AirLounge is a relatively lightweight seating module with almost no moving parts – the swing-up legrest is the sole motor-driven component – so Finnair enjoys increased reliability of the seat and greater fuel efficiency for the plane.)

Ironically, the AirLounge’s fixed-in-place nature requires more effort on the part of the passenger to get comfortable.

Because the seat doesn’t recline, you’re either sitting upright or lying flat – there’s no in-between position unless you create it yourself.

So be prepared to change position, wiggle around and nestle in, lean this way and slouch that way in order to make yourself at home, because the seat won’t do any of that for you.

You'll have to figure out how to find the most comfortable positions in Finnair's A330 business class.
You'll have to figure out how to find the most comfortable positions in Finnair's A330 business class.

Here are some tips to help you find your own comfort zone in Finnair’s A330 business class.

  • Use both of the supplied pillows and try placing them vertically, one above the other, for more back support (unfortunately, as soon as you shift around, so will the pillows) .
  • Experiment with the rolled-up mattress pad as a bolster, either behind your back or even positioned next to you to support your arm in this extra-wide seat.
  • Put the seat into ‘bed’ mode for extra room to sprawl out, stretchy your legs or even sit cross-legged.
  • Nestle yourself into the curved corner of the seat, closest to the aisle, rather than hard up against the flatter portion of the seatback.
  • If you have one of those U-shaped pillows that slips around your neck, for when you fly in premium economy or economy, bring it along on the Finnair flight – you might find it’s just the thing for when you’re sitting in the corner with your head against the back of the seat.
  • Get used to watching inflight moves or TV shows sitting up – not only does the seat not recline, but the 18” video screen doesn’t pivot down.
Pillows are your friend for getting comfy when sitting on Finnair's A330 business class.
Pillows are your friend for getting comfy when sitting on Finnair's A330 business class.

These tips apply equally to all 28 seats in Finnair’s A330 business class cabin, which follows a standard 1-2-1 layout (Finnair labels these seats as A-DH-L).

The paired D and H middle seats see both passengers seated directly next to the aisle, with the shelves of each seat between them.

The middle seats of the Qantas Finnair A330 business class cabin.
The middle seats of the Qantas Finnair A330 business class cabin.

As you’d expect, there’s also a privacy divider which by default is raised, but can be lowered for sociability if you’re flying with a friend or partner.

The middle seats of the Qantas Finnair A330 business class cabin.
The middle seats of the Qantas Finnair A330 business class cabin.

Sleeping in Finnair’s A330 business class

So much for sitting – but how about sleeping in Finnair’s A330 business class?

Two swing-up sections – one from directly beneath the seat and one from just ahead of it – create a long, wide continuous surface for sprawling and snoozing.

Here's how the Finnair business class seat converts from sofa to bed.
Here's how the Finnair business class seat converts from sofa to bed.

It’s in this mode that you realise how much surface space the seat has – at its widest point the seat measures over one metre, and while the bed is officially just shy of 2 metres it feels even longer.

And yes, when you lie down on this seat your head will be where (ahem) another part of your anatomy has been parked for hours, so that in itself isa good reason to plonk down the mattress.

Stretch right out when it's time to sleep on a Qantas Finnair A330 business class flight.
Stretch right out when it's time to sleep on a Qantas Finnair A330 business class flight.

(Qantas has opted to retain its own A330 toppers rather than use the custom-made Finnair ones, and while the QF mattresses are narrower they do the job.)

Then it’s just a matter of sinking down onto the seat with your head on the base of the seat, stretching out as far as you can and extending your feet into the nook in the opposite corner.

That cubby offers more space than conventional seats, with Finnair leaving one side open to the fuselage rather than making it a fully-enclosed box.

The 'foot nook' of most Finnair A330 business class seats.
The 'foot nook' of most Finnair A330 business class seats.

However, it tapers fairly quickly and your foot can annoyingly bump into an exposed metal support rod which is part of the seating module’s framework. This limits your movement and can cause an abrupt awakening if your feet accidentally hit the rod.

Due to the position of the seat and footspace, you’ll be lying on an angle rather than straight, and any passenger over average height will probably need to sleep on their side facing towards the window, with their knees drawn up and bent a little.

This is how most business class passengers will end up sleeping on the Qantas Finnair A330 flights.
This is how most business class passengers will end up sleeping on the Qantas Finnair A330 flights.

As is usually the case, seats at the very front of the cabin – row 1, in Finnair’s A330 – are the prize pick.

Row 1 on these Qantas Finnair A330 flights offers maximum room.
Row 1 on these Qantas Finnair A330 flights offers maximum room.

There’s not only greater distance between the seat and the bulkhead wall, but the foot nook is substantially larger in every dimension, and without a metal support rod in the way.

If you can’t nab one of the four seats in row 1 in the initial seat selection stage of your booking, watch for them to possibly open up when it’s time for online check-in.

Row 1 is the place to be on these Qantas Finnair A330 flights.
Row 1 is the place to be on these Qantas Finnair A330 flights.

Other features of Finnair’s A330 business class

It’s difficult not to admire the design of this seat, which channels the broad Scandi principles of simplicity, functionality and comfort; there’s no ornamentation or pretence, and definitely no bling.

You’ll feel wrapped in this cosy cocoon-like space, and it’s a surprisingly private environment thanks to the height and wrap-around design of the seat’s curved shell.

Finnair's A330 business class cabin has an incredibly high degree of privacy.
Finnair's A330 business class cabin has an incredibly high degree of privacy.

But Finnair’s AirLounge is definitely short on storage space compared to the Qantas Business Suite of both the Sydney-Singapore A330 and A380.

A small compartment seamlessly built into the seat just below the reading lamp offers little room for more than the IFE controller and supplied noise-cancelling headphones (which are never as good as your own ones).

This concealed nook in Finnair's A330 business class contains USB-A and USB-C ports.
This concealed nook in Finnair's A330 business class contains USB-A and USB-C ports.

There’s a second floor-rmounted compartment containing your water bottle and might fit a small tablet or e-book reader.

That said, Finnair’s business class seat ticks a few of the tech boxes: the shoulder-height compartment contains USB-A and USB-C power outlets, while a universal AC socket and second USB-A port are tucked away by the front of the seat (but out of the way of the legrest).

The bench has inbuilt wireless charging, with raised rubber guides to both help position your phone and keep it in place, and the laptop-friendly table which swings out from beneath the console (and is dressed in the same soft birch finish) can be nudged around so you can get up from the seat without having to first stow everything away.

The Qantas Finnair A330 business class would be a great office in the clouds, but for the lack of WiFi.
The Qantas Finnair A330 business class would be a great office in the clouds, but for the lack of WiFi.

And there are two must-see ‘channels’ on the IFE system showing a live view below and ahead of the plane, which are quite enjoyable during take-off and landing.

Unfortunately, the WiFi system on Finnair’s A330s – which use the same Panasonic Ku-band satellites as Singapore Airlines and Emirates, among others – has been disabled for these Qantas flights.

Other notes from the Qantas Finnair A330 flight

The enthusiastic Finnair crew on these flights are all Singapore-based, and welcomed the opportunity to be making trips and overnight stays in Sydney instead of Helsinki.

And my Sydney-Singapore trip featured one of the better Neil Perry menus I’ve had on a Qantas flight to Asia. 

Lunch was served about an hour after take-off, and yes, the ‘aperitivo’ of a margarita and a solitary mozzarella & pine nut pesto arancini ball looked quite lonely...

'Aperitivo' on my Qantas Finnair A330 business class Sydney-Singapore flight.
'Aperitivo' on my Qantas Finnair A330 business class Sydney-Singapore flight.

... but it was followed up by a solid choice of starters:

  • carrot and thyme soup (I generally avoid soups inflight, worried about splattering drops and serious spillage onto my clothes from a sudden bout of turbulence)
  • salmon crudo salad (this was my pick, and it proved delicious )
  • Bannockburn chicken skewers (to which fellow travellers gave the thumbs up)
Salmon crudo salad on my Qantas Finnair A330 business class Sydney-Singapore flight.
Salmon crudo salad on my Qantas Finnair A330 business class Sydney-Singapore flight.

The mains also hit the spot, with a selection of

  • seared snapper with shiitake mushrooms, bamboo shoots and jasmine rice
  • Barrington Hinterland beer fillet with roasted potatoes, braised cabbage and mushroom butter
  • ‘hot and numbing’ Barrowdale pork stir fry (my choice, thankfully it was only modestly hot and not tongue-tingling)
  • a plant-based dining option of roast cauliflower with pearl couscous, zucchini and an almond and tahini dressing
‘Hot and numbing’ Barrowdale pork on my Qantas Finnair A330 business class Sydney-Singapore flight.
‘Hot and numbing’ Barrowdale pork on my Qantas Finnair A330 business class Sydney-Singapore flight.

To finish up, business class passengers could choose between a cheese platter, a mango mouse with condensed milk Chantilly, ice cream and fruit.

A light meal was offered 90 minutes prior to the scheduled 6pm landing at Singapore’s Changi Airport. Given the timing, this is less of a replacement for dinner than something to keep the tummy rumbles at bay.

In business class we were offered a spinach and feta filo pie, or Vietnamese-style lemongrass beef brisket noodles.

Vietnamese-style lemongrass beef brisket noodles on my Qantas Finnair A330 business class Sydney-Singapore flight.
Vietnamese-style lemongrass beef brisket noodles on my Qantas Finnair A330 business class Sydney-Singapore flight.

The Finnair A330’s galley contained the usual selection of mid-flight snacks such as biscuits, chips and chocolate, and the Champagne served is either Duval-Leroy Brut or Jacquart Brut Mosaique, depending on the which is loaded. 

Roo meets reindeer: flying the Qantas Finnair A330

The Finnair A330 will largely replace Qantas’ own A330 flights QF81/QF82 on the Sydney-Singapore route, while supplementing the flagship Airbus A380 to London.

These Finnair A330 flights will carry their own unique flight number: watch for QF291 from Sydney to Singapore, and QF292 from Singapore back to Sydney.

At the time of writing, the Finnair jets are flying Sydney-Singapore on Monday through Friday, with the red-tailed A330s more likely to appear on the weekend.

A second leased Finnair A330 will be swung onto the Sydney-Bangkok route beginning March 31 2024, where the daily QF23/QF24 Qantas A330 flights will be replaced by the Finnair A330s under flight numbers QF295/QF296.

This will also mean that Qantas will offer premium economy between Sydney and Bangkok – something that’s missing from the red-tailed A330s – in the form of Finnair’s own premium economy recliner.

iM
iM

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

27 Jul 2016

Total posts 57

I flew this Finnair business class Tokyo-Helsinki in August and quite enjoyed it. Once you get your head around how it works, it's really spacious around your head and shoulders and I didn't have any trouble getting comfortable. Will happily fly it with QF in the new year.

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

21 Jul 2014

Total posts 32

I tried these seats recently on a Finnair flight to Tokyo. and I was quite comfortable sitting in them and felt I had plenty of room for my upper body. My main beef with these seats is when they are in bed mode and you need to rise during the night to go to the toilet. Getting in and out (up and then back down I guess) on paper should be simple but I found it frustratingly difficult to get back into bed without messing up the topper. And the cramped footwell was unpleasantly tight. Just a little wider would have been okay. And I would have preferred more flexible cushions when sitting up. Full marks for effort and lower fuel costs, and perhaps the next gen will get it just right.

05 Jan 2021

Total posts 25

Pity meals are provided by Qantas rather than Finnair !

My experience with the Finns is that business class meals are a leap ahead of QF .

In fact , I have yet to fly on another airline that matches the unbelievably poor Qantas longer distance Business Class menu offering which recently involved two ( yes 2 ) plant based options , a spicy Asian option , a vegetarian one and one  traditional meat or chicken dish !

Lets hope Neil Perry follows the lead of Chris Joyce and exits the scene also .

Hi

For me the seat was awkward and uncomfortable except in that time sitting bolt upright to watch the screen.  The "bolsters" when put out to form the "bed" didn't match up properly so did not provide a level "bed".  All the movement forward and back to squeeze into and out of the space at the end was really awkward and even when all the way down the whole bed was uncomfortable.  Moving around once encased was really difficult and getting up and down for the bathroom was incredibly difficult.  I'm biggish but felt squeezed in and trying to move was too awkward.  You can keep the Scandi design features - I'm not going on Finnair metal again! (And did the back of the seat area have to be so hard?)

Oh and PS it gets worse if you have dodgy knees/hips/back  - which is not uncommon for those in business class

Actually, I found the seat quite comfortable - I suffer from chronic back issues, and the ability to comfortably lay on my side was a bonus. Although I’ll be flying it overnight for the first time soon, and being fully flat, with no option for a slight incline, might be an issue (usually in this position pain eventually wakes me up and I’ll feel very stiff and unable to move without using my arms for support, so we’ll see how it goes).

23 Dec 2021

Total posts 3

I think my Size 14 feet and 2M frame may not be compatible.

I hope the steak was properly cooked. My flight to Singapore a couple of weeks ago on the 787 had the same meal and the butter didn't melt it was that tepid.

They also ran out of champagne 2 hours into the flight.

British AIrways

08 Feb 2011

Total posts 22

I can easily understand that people hate that seat but after the first flight it became my favourite.

I'm tall so I enjoy all the available space in that seat, I simply put it into flat mode for the whole duration of the flight.  I lounge on it, I eat in buddha position, I really enjoy that it basically gives me a large, flat surface to do whatever I want.

Congrats to Australians on getting those planes on the Qantas routes.   I hope to fly one of them when we come down under the next time.

Etihad - Etihad Guest

21 Jul 2019

Total posts 165

Thanks for the honest review, David. I especially noted your copious take on this controversial seat. As you plainly stated, it takes "more effort" on the part of the passenger to get comfortable. This is a drawback, and pretty much can't be sugar-coated, especially for those of us who find reclining - with legs supported and slightly elevated - the most comfortable position (as opposed to sitting bolt-upright or even laying flat.) With no preset recline option, I've still got my doubts about this seat. Perhaps the next generation may be improved? In the meantime, I'll stick with the tried-and tested seats we're all familiar with. Thanks again for not brushing over this aspect.

24 Mar 2020

Total posts 4

As a Platinum Qantas flyer I find that Singapore and Qatar/ Emirates are for more comfortable..so this seems to be a sell on a second class solution for Qantas as they have fleet problems.. in reality you are flying on another airline..so Qantas is only a travel agent for Finnair

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer P1

23 Aug 2014

Total posts 139

Thanks David

Glad you noticed the annoying metal rod which I have mentioned on flyer talk in earlier posts; my 6'4" son flew them Doha to Copenhagen (yes, an usual route as well) and had a terrible time getting comfortable in seat mode compared to the more traditional J seat these days

A medical observation is that individuals with lower back problems and knee problems will potentially have more symptoms in the seated position due to the points you make, as "legs stretching straight forward" is usually better for these individuals 

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

26 Nov 2012

Total posts 123

Good review David.  I love everything about Finnair but I did find it hard to get my comfort sweet spot, but when I did it was great. I must admit, I slept most of the way from HEL to BKK recently, so I guess that’s a good testimonial.  For what it’s worth, I do like the ‘real’ QF seat too

BA Gold

01 Apr 2012

Total posts 192

Just out of curiosity, I am guessing the crew being Singapore based are Singaporean?  Are there any Finnish crew on the flight at all?

How worldly.  A Qantas flight being operated by a Finnish operator using a Singaporean crew.

24 Oct 2010

Total posts 2555

The inaugural flight appeared to one archetype Finn on duty in a senior cabin role, but unsure of his base or if that's an ongoing thing. All the cabin crew working across the business class cabin were Singapore-based and a range of 'Asian' nationalities.

02 Jul 2011

Total posts 61

I flew the Finnair a350 when they launched these seats. While I love the overall design, the one area that let it down were the two tiny flat pillows that were expected to do all the back support. If they provided bigger puffier pillows to support your back the arrangement would be perfect.

QFP

22 Jan 2013

Total posts 97

Hello all,

Any comments about how the seat allows/restricts the view out the window?  Is it hard to get a good view down and around the outside world?  

24 Oct 2010

Total posts 2555

While passengers are obviously not sitting directly next to the window, you do have to learn onto that side-table if you want a better look. However this wasn't a problem for me: I didn't have any difficulty sticky-beaking at various stages during the flight, including shortly after take-off when the new Western Sydney Airport came into view. Snapped some pics of this. I'd suggest that one elbow on the side table, with a glass of Champers or whatever in the other hand as you gaze out the window lost in your thoughts, is a pretty cool look :)

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

02 Jul 2011

Total posts 1378

Thanks for the detailed review. 

How knowledgeable were the Finnair crew about the QF meals/ wines (typically one of the stronger points of the QF service imho)

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

03 Jan 2013

Total posts 59

I have done this product on many sectors and enjoy it. I like the the Finn’s philosophy of doing more with less, not dressing things with useless extras. The only thing I would add is probably a larger cushion to compliment the smaller one.

30 Dec 2018

Total posts 1

I'm not a fan having recently flown this seat from HEL-JFK.  Whilst i would not say never again, Id choose a J seat which reclines over this every time on an overnight flight. 

It is true it feels spacious and comfortable enough when seated upright as one can rest feet on the ledge of the ottoman although they could do to provide a full size pillow. 

The lack of accessible storage when seated is annoying, it means handbags or any personal item bigger than a tablet have to go in the overhead bin and shoes have to be placed under the raised part of the seat which makes them difficult to retrieve when you inevitably need to put them on to go to the toilet.

The experience deteriorates in sleep mode.  

The seat is very firm compared with other carriers and the paper thin mattress topper does not attach to the seat in anyway so does not stay in place as you scoot down into the sleep position. 

Because of the angle of the foot well seat only suits side sleepers and you can only really sleep on your side facing the window so choose you seat wisely. If you want to lay on your back there is not room to have you legs straight, only bent with knees pointed to the ceiling.

Worst bit is the sleeping seat belt, it s different to the one worn when seated and is fully retractable. This mean its constricts tightly over you hips and make it difficult to move up/down or roll over or move the duvet.  It would be better to have a lap belt that can be loosened a bit.

As other have said all the effort is on the passenger to maneuver into the lying position and then to get back up out of it. Problem is its all curved surfaces there are no handles or anything to grip or for feet to get purchase on to help pull/push yourself back into a seated position, so you can lower the ottoman and stand up.  I had a knee injury and it was such an effort to get up ( i actually worked up a sweat), once I returned from toilet I just stayed seated upright for the remainder of the flight.

I could not honestly recommend this seat to anyone who has mobility issues or who struggles to get up off the floor; or for anyone who needs proper lumbar support.  No consideration given to those who may have dodgy hips, knees or back.

It is polarizing for sure.  

I think if there were going to be no recline they needed to alternate the layout such that the footwell is directly in front of the seat (that way you can lay on either side or you back), add a handle/rail to help pull oneself up, have a way to attach the mattress topper so it stays in place, a larger pillow and a sleeping belt that can be a bit looser on the hips.

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

16 Jan 2018

Total posts 50

I flew Finnair new business class 4 times already, and have always liked it. I guess it depends on the kind of person you are. I am the 'restless' type, so I cannot stay in one position for too long. Those traditional business class seats with recliners mean needing to frequently tinker about those myriad reclining buttons and they can get old quickly. With the Finnair couch concept, I just had to move around the pillows and voila!

In fact, I flew Qantas A330 business class not too long ago, after having done the Finnair business class several times, and I found Qantas A330 business to be rather narrow, espeecially around the shoulder area. In terms of sleepign space, you get a ton more space with Finnair's seat then Qantas'.

I just admire those Nordic creativity and boldness to launch something so "controversial" (well, relatively speaking...), when most other airlines, even major ones, stick with incremental/derivative improvements, just more blings, bells and whistles.

17 Nov 2023

Total posts 13

I've flown it from HEL - BKK and I loved it!  Plenty of room for your feet and enough padding for a good side sleep on either side :)

28 Apr 2021

Total posts 15

David, an excellent review and bravo not only for the comprehensive outline, but also for continuously referring in the article, to those who are airline travelers as "Passengers".

This is an extremely difficult WORD for Qantas to use for those who are either at the airport or on board the plane. 

All will agree that 'customer' is the appropriate terminology when one is buying goods (or a airline ticket) but how quickly any such reference is dropped when an incident occurs and when any associated Qantas difficulties are experienced. 

Could it be that the new CEO has the fortitude to herald such bold change. 


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