Virgin begins upgrade of 737 business, economy class

There’s something for everyone in Virgin Australia’s second-gen business and economy class.

By David Flynn, November 24 2023
Virgin begins upgrade of 737 business, economy class

Virgin Australia will begin upgrading its Boeing 737 fleet with new-look seats in business and economy class next week, with the first of the refreshed jets taking to the skies in December.

It’ll be followed by the rest of the Virgin 737 fleet in a steady stream through to late 2025, with work on the $110 million interior refresh being carried out in Melbourne.

Here’s a quick look at what passengers can expect:

  • Wider business class seats with leg rests, foot rests and AC/USB sockets
  • More comfortable ribbed economy seats with USB power
  • Every seat will sport an inbuilt holder for tablets and smartphones
  • Inflight WiFi across all 737 jets

These are the same seats as featured on Virgin’s newest Boeing 737 MAX jets, and there’s news on that front too.

Virgin Australia's new-look business and economy seats will be fitted to all 737s.
Virgin Australia's new-look business and economy seats will be fitted to all 737s.

Vigin Australia’s third 737 MAX is slated to arrive into the airline’s Brisbane hangars today, Friday November 24, with Virgin also signing on the dotted line for an additional six 737 MAX 8 jets on top of the current order of eight.

And Virgin is keen to get its next-gen jets flying: with three already being handed over, the remaining 11 will all be delivered by the end of 2024.

Those will be followed by 25 of the larger Boeing 737 MAX 10 jets, which will carry more passengers for around the same amount of fuel – albeit over a slightly shorter range - in the same two-class business/economy configuration beginning late 2025.

“Travel demand remains high and we continue to grow and renew our fleet, enabling us to deliver great value and choice in the market,” says Alistair Hartley, Virgin Australia's Chief Strategy and Transformation Officer.

One way the MAX jets will help cater to that demand will be their massive overhead luggage bins.

These adopt a more cavernous design allowing “capacity to stow up to 50% more carry-on baggage” – sufficient to accommodate one standard-sized carry-on bag for every passenger because those bags can now slide in on their side, rather than going in flat.

Deeper overhead storage bins should mean less roaming to find the last available space.
Deeper overhead storage bins should mean less roaming to find the last available space.

Even so, the airline says its carry-on luggage limits will not be increasing, and will remain pegged at the current 7kg of economy and up to two smaller items of 7kg each in business class.

The MAX series “will do a great job for us transcontinental (and) it’ll do a great job for us in more traditional short-haul international routes,” Virgin Australia Group CEO Jayne Hrdlicka has previously remarked.

In addition to key domestic routes, Virgin says the 737 MAX 8s will head for short-range overseas destinations including Bali, Fiji and Samoa.

 

Virgin Australia’s new business, economy seats

What can travellers expect from Virgin Australia’s new business class and economy class seats?

If you’ve flown on one of the two Virgin 737s which used to belong to Singapore Airlines’ regional arm SilkAir, these new seats won’t be new at all.

That’s because those two jets were used as a test-bed to assess these exact same seats from late 2021, meaning Virgin’s frequent flyers are likely to already have encountered them on the domestic network.

Virgin's new 737 MAX business and economy seats are the same as those trialled on two older 737-800s since late 2021.
Virgin's new 737 MAX business and economy seats are the same as those trialled on two older 737-800s since late 2021.

(One give-away that you are on an ex-SilkAir 737 is the former airline’s floral detailing which remains embossed on the bulkhead in front of business class).

However, those two Virgin 737 test-bed aircraft lacked any divider between the business and economy cabins – something which premium passengers were quick to notice and complain about, although economy passengers in the first row (row 3) loved the extra legroom.

Virgin promises there'll be "a new design cabin divider" between business and economy.
Virgin promises there'll be "a new design cabin divider" between business and economy.

This time around, Virgin says there will be “a new design cabin divider between business class and economy.”

The familiar cabin divider between business and economy on Virgin's 737-800 fleet.
The familiar cabin divider between business and economy on Virgin's 737-800 fleet.

“The new divider will allow for greater floor space in the economy cabin and the subsequent installation of between six and 12 additional economy seats,” the airline adds, which indicates a net gain of at least one economy row by slightly re-adjusting the mounting point of each row when the new seats are installed.

Virgin promises there'll be "a new design cabin divider" between business and economy.
Virgin promises there'll be "a new design cabin divider" between business and economy.

While the airline has yet to reveal what this ‘new design cabin divider’ will look like, we wouldn’t be surprised if this is the Boeing Sky Divider or similar, such as as this version fitted to the new Malaysia Airlines Boeing 737 MAX, which Executive Traveller toured this week.

The divider is a thin panel which hangs from the ceiling to delineate the business and economy cabins but doesn’t extend all the way to the floor.

The Boeing Sky Divider on Malaysia Airlines' 737 MAX.
The Boeing Sky Divider on Malaysia Airlines' 737 MAX.

The resultant swathe of space between the first row of economy and the rear of the business class cabin unlocks the most legroom of any seat on the plane.

Thanks to the Boeing Sky Divider, there's legroom to spare in the first row of Malaysia Airlines' 737 MAX economy cabin.
Thanks to the Boeing Sky Divider, there's legroom to spare in the first row of Malaysia Airlines' 737 MAX economy cabin.

Compare this to the current divider-free space between economy and business on the Virgin 737 MAX, as shown below.

On Virgin's 737 MAX, Economy X row 3 already enjoys significant legroom.
On Virgin's 737 MAX, Economy X row 3 already enjoys significant legroom.

Virgin Australia’s new business class seats

Virgin Australia’s new Boeing 737 MAX business class seat, which will eventually be rolled across all Virgin Boeing 737s, is an overdue equaliser against that of Qantas’ Boeing 737 business class, and in some areas it even pulls ahead.

As with its other 737s, the MAX has two rows of four seats in business.
As with its other 737s, the MAX has two rows of four seats in business.

For starters, an extendable legrest and footrest swings up from the front of the seat (which is the MiQ model from Collins Aerospace). That’s been missing from Virgin Australia business class for way too long.

More comfort above the clouds: an extendable legrest and footrest.
More comfort above the clouds: an extendable legrest and footrest.

Combine this with a five-inch recline – an extra two inches over Virgin’s standard economy seat – and you’re pretty much set for a power nap after that too-early start or at the end of a long day.

(For an added cradling effect, the front of the seat angles up slightly as you recline – although if you’re of average height you may find the footrest sits better against your feet when the seat’s not reclined.)

More comfort above the clouds: an extendable legrest and footrest.
More comfort above the clouds: an extendable legrest and footrest.

Even if the passenger in front of you fully reclines their seat, it doesn’t overly encroach on ‘your’ space and there’s still enough room to keep working away on your laptop – although if your legrest is full extended, the top of your feet can catch on the base of the seat ahead.

The armrest at the aisle seats (1C, 1D, 2C and 2D) can be lowered for easier access by less mobile guests.

The aisle armrest on these business class seats retracts for easier access.
The aisle armrest on these business class seats retracts for easier access.

The seat has more of a ‘design' feel than its predecessor, and the padding and support of the ribbed upholstery hits the ‘just right’ spot between firm and soft, making it noticeably more comfortable than what you’ll be accustomed to – but this could also be because the seats are new, rather than having survived 10+ years of heavy-duty wear.

Smart design makes for better use of space on the back of the business class seats, too.
Smart design makes for better use of space on the back of the business class seats, too.

Another welcome win for Virgin’s premium passengers: AC and USB power sockets. Finally.

While a handful of Virgin’s Boeing 737s sport AC outlets tucked away at the front of their business class seats, these new seats make this less of an afterthought – and they pair that 240V port with a high-power USB-A socket so you can keep all your travel tech charged up.

Keep your travel tech topped up thanks to inbuilt AC/USB outlets.
Keep your travel tech topped up thanks to inbuilt AC/USB outlets.

As a bonus, the AC/USB outlets are where you need them – literally at your elbow – so there’s no fumbling around the front of the seat, AC plug in hand, trying to blindly slide those prongs into the socket.

The AC and USB sockets are easily accessed beneath the armrest.
The AC and USB sockets are easily accessed beneath the armrest.

You’ll find both power ports in a recess under the armrest – just flip up the lid, slot in your cables and start juicing up your gadgets.

That nook is plenty deep enough to stow knick-knacks ranging from reading glasses or sunglasses to an inflight amenity kit, notepads, books and tablets.

While Virgin Australia’s new business class seats still lack the personal video screen of their Qantas counterparts, many tech-toting travellers will prefer Virgin’s innovative approach of integrating a tablet or smartphone stand into the tray table.

We love this simple, smart and sturdy device holder built into the business class tray table.
We love this simple, smart and sturdy device holder built into the business class tray table.

In its half-open position, a metal flap swings firmly up – with a deliberately stiff movement – to keep your device confidently propped up at desired angle.

Bring your own entertainment and noise-cancelling headphones? This is the way...
Bring your own entertainment and noise-cancelling headphones? This is the way...

And there’s room in front for some snacks to nibble on while you watch your BYO entertainment.

Nothing like a few nibbles while you catch up on the latest ep of your favourite TV show.
Nothing like a few nibbles while you catch up on the latest ep of your favourite TV show.

Fully extended, the tray is quite stable and will provide ample real estate for even the largest laptop.

Road warriors will appreciate the sturdy table and nearby AC outlet.
Road warriors will appreciate the sturdy table and nearby AC outlet.

The Executive Traveller take: Virgin’s new business class seat is a sensible evolution of the current domestic and short-range international product.

Virgin Australia’s new economy class seats

Let’s be honest: there’s only so much you can do with an economy seat.

Cabin space is limited and airline budgets are limited, so as a result, legroom is limited.

Standard economy seats onboard the 737 MAX
Standard economy seats onboard the 737 MAX

But with Virgin’s Boeing 737 MAX economy seat just a few small changes sum to a better experience, beginning with a little more legroom.

The slimmer seat means there's a bit more room to stretch your legs.
The slimmer seat means there's a bit more room to stretch your legs.

This is due to the seat itself being slimmer, although that doesn’t come at the expense of comfort: the same ribbed design as in business class appears here, and the seat is no harder on your back than Virgin’s regular Boeing 737 economy pew.

It’s simply that considered design aligned with modern manufacturing and materials can trim the seat’s profile and free up extra space where it’s needed: at the knees and shins.

(Also slimmer: the armrest between the seats, which adds a smidge more room at your hips but makes it almost useless for resting your arm if you’re sharing with a seat mate.)

The safety card and ‘buy on board’ menu have been relocated to a dedicated nook at the top of the setback, above the tray table, decluttering the mesh pocket at the bottom of the seat so that it’s yours to use as you see fit.

Economy seats now put two pockets at your disposal.
Economy seats now put two pockets at your disposal.

At the front of the safety card nook and above the latch for the tray table sits a clever plastic lip which folds out and acts as a perch for your tablet or smartphone, again playing to Virgin’s ‘BYO entertainment’ model.

On the Boeing 737 MAX and all future economy upgrades to the 737s, Virgin has provided a convenient USB-A socket to keep the battery on your tablet or phone topped up.

Hurrah! USB power for every Virgin Australia 737 economy passenger.
Hurrah! USB power for every Virgin Australia 737 economy passenger.

Another change coming to Virgin’s 737 economy cabin: a refinement of the current cabin configuration will also see one Economy X row replaced by a row of standard economy seating on all Boeing 737-800 aircraft.

Economy X seats occupy row 3, 4, 5, 13 and 14.
Economy X seats occupy row 3, 4, 5, 13 and 14.

The Executive Traveller take: with more comfort, legroom and convenience features than Virgin Australia’s regular economy seat, this new model is – like its business class counterpart – a sensible step forward for the airline.

Virgin Australia 737 MAX seat pitch, recline

Given the MAX’s intended international focus, comfort levels for those longer flights will be an important consideration for many travellers.

The good news is adjustments have been made to seat pitch and recline, though perhaps not as significantly as many may have hoped.

Economy X is the biggest overall winner, with those seats now sporting the same 5-inch recline as business class – up from the standard 3-inches seen across the wider economy cabin.

Seat pitch and recline on the Virgin Australia 737 MAX is as follows: 

Business Class:

  • 5-inch recline
  • 38-inch seat pitch (one more than the current Boeing 737-800)

Economy X:

  • 5-inch recline (an increase of 1-inch)
  • 34-inch seat pitch

Economy:

  • 3-inch recline
  • 30 to 31-inches seat pitch depending on row

The Executive Traveller take: while changes are indeed minimal, it’s not particularly surprising. After all, Virgin has stated it will include between six and 12 additional economy seats. That space has to come from somewhere.

Virgin 737 MAX vs Qantas A321neo

While the past two decades have seen Qantas and Virgin both flying the Boeing 737 as the backbone of their domestic inter-city networks, that all changes from the end of 2023, when Qantas will add the Airbus A220 – a game-changing jet capable of tackling inter-city as well as regional routes – with the Qantas Airbus A321XLR joining the fray from late 2024.

However, it appears the first Qantas A321XLRs won’t push that transformative envelope to include lie-flat beds in business class, with Qantas instead settling for an updated version of a premium economy-style recliner at the pointy end.

ET readers: what’s your take on Virgin Australia’s new-look business and economy seats? Share your thoughts in the Comments area below (NB: please keep those comments focussed on the seats, not on the 737 MAX as an aircraft or on its initial Cairns-Tokyo route.)

Virgin Australia - Velocity Rewards

24 Jan 2018

Total posts 688

Am about to fly in the 737Max, seat 1A, but not expecting quite the same high level of VA service here (Bonza) as VA2.  Will revert with comments tonight!  😁

QF

11 Jul 2014

Total posts 951

Hopefully I find it on one of my domestic route soon to try it out.

24 Oct 2020

Total posts 4

Having read the above E T article " in full ", It certainly looks as though Virgin Australia is doing what their Exec said; " Listening closely to passengers/clients " opines on their inflight experiences over the past couple of years &            " doing something about it " accordingly.  The quality of & close ups of the pics in this article are first rate, & the seats in both business & economy do look very comfortable. Where the USB & power sockets have been relocated to in business class, is really smart & " convenient " design thinking.  

Taking known aircraft restriction parameters into account; sadly enough I think, too many airline/aircraft designers often fall back on the " same old, same old " approach & don't think " outside the box " regarding passenger needs/expectations when they're in the air either for the short or long haul.  I've only flown on a Virgin Australia aircraft once. Granted; it was only a homeward-bound one hr flight  several yrs ago pre-Covid; but even then I found their seating capacity arrangements roomy, comfortable & inflight cabin crew service " right up there " umm, please excuse the altitude pun.  Hopefully what V A have done on " inflight R & D " over the past couple of yrs really pays off ( for their passengers ) & sets a much higher bar for competing Airlines to match or surpass.

XWu
XWu

09 May 2020

Total posts 561

So we are only allowed to discuss about seats not the luggage bins, even though it was part of the features mentioned in the main article!

So I can’t make an observation that the luggages in the photo demonstrating the larger bin size are the kind that people are bringing on board nowadays but if VA ever enforce their own hand carry luggage dimensions, most people will fail to meet the requirements 

24 Oct 2010

Total posts 2561

You can also discuss the luggage bins :)

03 Mar 2023

Total posts 9

So no IFE.  Really?  Not even in business class?  Hard pass.  Yet if I fly United Airlines in the US domestically on their new 737's there's an IFE screen in every seat.  Sad.

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

25 Feb 2017

Total posts 14

There's free IFE - you just need to access it through your own device.    I've changed my view on in-seat screens over the years.   I'm told the systems add so much weight to the aircraft, and most people have their own devices these days anyway.   So as long as they still provide wifi and in-seat power, I'm OK with no in-seat screens for domestic.  

24 Aug 2011

Total posts 1205

Many airlines are moving towards BYOD with USB power available in the seat.  IFE adds weight and can be unreliable leading to lots of passenger angst when their screen is faulty.  Flew to Cairns on Qantas a couple of weeks ago and 3 screens were faulty on 737.  Crew spent a lot of time trying to get them working and then trying to placate the understandably disappointed passengers.

Virgin Australia - Velocity Rewards

07 Dec 2014

Total posts 174

Interesting they have installed USB A chargers in a world moving to USB C. My last two Samsung phones came with a USB C power brick and a USB C to USB C cable. New iPhones come with a USB C cable. Perhaps today USB A is still more widely used, these seats are there for 10 years.

24 Aug 2011

Total posts 1205

I assume there may come a time when the USB-A points are replaced by the USB-C but the USB-C points do deliver more power so I am unsure whether this is possible given available power delivered to each seat.

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

06 Oct 2016

Total posts 165

USB=C is mandated in the EU from end of 2024 for phone and 2026 for laptops, since the system is designed to be 2 way, they can't really avoid it over there. I expect that will see the end of the Universal AC plug under your thighs. Hopefully the types of USB will be captured on Aerolopa and Seatmaps in the future

I have seen even in the US that SouthWest, who did not have any power, are now fitting duel port (A/C) on their newer 737Max

Virgin Australia - Velocity Rewards

20 Dec 2016

Total posts 15

Interested to try the new economy seats as having flown a number of Airbus overseas on different airlines over the past 12 months must say they have the most uncomfortable economy seats compared to the Boeing 737 

24 Aug 2011

Total posts 1205

Seats are specified by the airlines, not the manufacturers so there is no correspondence as to whether a 737 or A320 seat is more comfortable.  The only practical difference is the Airbus is wider so, in theory, each seat can be wider though, in practice, many airlines who operate both types use the same seat and the extra width on the A320 just goes into the aisle width.

31 Jul 2022

Total posts 2

I wish they would have the bigger overheads. Flying from Melbourne to Sydney and watching the FAs trying to store the ridiculous huge carry ons made us later and later. Flew from Darwin to Melbourne on the ex silk air plane. At first I thought the seat was uncomfortable but after about 5 minutes I found them very good.

24 Aug 2011

Total posts 1205

There was a retrofit available on 737NGs to put the larger bins in.  QF trialed the larger bins on 2 738s about 10 years ago but never went further which makes me think that the costs must've been prohibitive.

Virgin Australia - Velocity Rewards

24 Jan 2018

Total posts 688

OK, so flew Bonza (as mentioned) on the 737 Max-8 - on a 65 minute flight, co-incidentally within 5 days of having flown back from Bali in EconomyX (a 5.5 hour flight).  Alle seats on Bonza the same, only difference is space between some rows.  Boza seats made by Recaro.  Not very comfortable at all compared to the longer flight above.  Just hope Virgin using a better quality seat cushion than those in Bonza planes.  USB charging port in top-right corner of seat in front, AC down the bottom, compared to the Virgin pics of both on the same panel/plate.

Bins were noticeably larger, pax allowed an 8Kg carry-on compared to Virgin's 7Kg.  Bonza pax warned of risk of carry-on being checked, but not sure they yet have adequate gate staff to do that.  I had checked luggage and am guilty of needing to learn to use those kiosk things to self check luggage (as a Platinum flier with VA I never bothered to learn).  

No, there's no IFE kit, but I always carry enough downloaded stuff from Netflix that I don't bother with a Carrier's stock.  What was really pleasing - no F&B trolley blocking passage (need to order and pay for it using their App).  On a 65 minute flight I couldn't be bothered, but my brother did on a longer flight with Bonza and it worked well for him).

Back to Virgin, hope the vanilla Economy seats are more comfortable than Bonza.  But even if they're not, Virgin's typically awesome cabin staff will no doubt compensate for that with service.  The return sectors on Bonza ($248) are also serviced by Qantas D8Q3 Turbo props @ $537 and Rex SAAB340 Turbo props $511, but the latter offer 3 x daily services whereas Bonza offers 3 x weekly only (Mon, Wed & Fri).  Will use Bonza again when Virgin not available.

QF

11 Jul 2014

Total posts 951

Where did you fly BT?

And yr 100% right VA cabin staff make it!!!!!

08 Jul 2023

Total posts 1

Very ordinary and dated J class for a brand new plane, they could have at least done something like Turkish Airlines on the 321neo that offers a little more privacy. Imagine flying to Japan on this thing ...

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

20 Mar 2012

Total posts 233

Disappointed they didn’t mirror the flyDubai cabin. It would have cost them only two seats to have a cabin of 10 lie-flats in J. 

24 Aug 2011

Total posts 1205

Not sure where you get the 2 seats from.  Fly Dubai have 172 seats (10/162) on their MAX-8s whereas VA have 182 (8/174).  

The issue with lie-flats is that they use a lot of space and unless pax are prepared to pay a significant premium over current VA J prices, it just doesn't make financial sense.

Yes, it's one thing to call for a flatbed seat on the VA 737 MAX but will passengers pony up the money for a higher airfare due to the lower premium seat count? The ball is now in Qantas' court to show a better effort on its A321 series.

09 Jul 2023

Total posts 1

I can’t believe in 2023 VA has opted for USB-A.

I don’t own a single cable or device that uses USB-A. I would consider it legacy tech these days.

I hate the marketing spin on this new “ribbed padding” for their seats. It’s simply jargon language for VA having removed a large amount of foam to save weight and space on their aircraft at the expense of PAX comfort.

Ribbed padding does not and will not hold up in longevity and will be as thin as a table cloth within 24 months. Hardly revolutionary.

Virgin Australia - Velocity Rewards

24 Jan 2018

Total posts 688

Bricc Flyer - you're right in everything you say (write), but let's be honest, a USB-A cable to USB-C costs just $6 in Officeworks and I always keep one in my cabin bag (it never leaves that home).  

I'm too old and self-conscious these days, but wind back the clock 20 years and for $6 I'd carry a spare cable it to sell to the pax next to me for $20 - just for a laugh, then handed the $20 note back towards the end of the flight  (how's that for IFE !!).  

15 May 2016

Total posts 8

Economy still looks rubbish. Almost bolt upright. No shape or slope to the base of the seats which means your upper legs will get sore after a while. When will airlines copy the car companies and make sculptured seats that are actually comfy to sit in?

06 Sep 2019

Total posts 29

I've flown in business and economy using the new seats. As a larger guy, the new economy seats definitely felt more roomy than the old economy seats and I found them reasonably comfortable for a 2 hour flight.

11 May 2022

Total posts 2

From the airline - USB-A for the 737-8s and across the fleet where USB power already exists. For aircraft receiving restored seats where USB power is not already fitted, they’ll receive a combo USB-A/C solution 🙂

QF

11 Jul 2014

Total posts 951

I’m amazed no one has mentioned the deletion of row 5 economy x in the new design and some what it appears what VA Mark 2 said about there core business plan to compete with Jetstar……….

23 Oct 2014

Total posts 230

Jetstar 

-has no lounge 

-no priority boarding 

-no business class on domestic 

-29in seat pitch through the ENTIRE cabin

-no FF scheme - just a tag into parent companies that can be severed at any stage 

Virgin with one less row of Econ X - reflects Jetstar at 0%

QF

11 Jul 2014

Total posts 951

Nothing in common with Jetstar?

Virgin Australia - Velocity Rewards

24 Jan 2018

Total posts 688

I have little confidence in the VA 'brains trust', if they can't profit from adding a 3rd row of J-class (4 seats) at the expense of 1 row (6 seats) in eco, then they need to get a new team in in their business development department.  

The proof of that is in my own observations, twice over the last 8 months, of a spare, un-occupied seat in business.  Clearly, no-one on board had the information (on the pax manifest), or authority, to identify a valued flyer in economy (platinum or gold) and offer a complimentary upgrade.  In the hospitality sector this is frequently used to 'educate' or entice the upgraded guest on their next stay.  And it works in over 80% of instances.

24 Aug 2011

Total posts 1205

So, from your observations, you say VA can't fill all 8 J seats so, on that basis, they should add another 4?

How do you know that the vacant J seat you saw wasn't next to a super-high value Beyond member and there is more value in letting that person have a vacant seat next to them rather than having them sit next to somebody on a freebie?

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

11 Nov 2016

Total posts 48

The seat may have been unserviceable.

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

14 Jan 2015

Total posts 36

I can't understand all the hype for this cabin update - it's incredibly boring. Once the "new smell" wears off it will just be average.

24 Aug 2011

Total posts 1205

It's not exciting but it is a narrowbody principally doing 1-2 hour sectors.  Is there an exciting product in this sector anywhere?  Do a search on the cebin LH are fitting to their new A321s and you'll probably say VA are doing a great job.

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

14 Jan 2015

Total posts 36

Am waiting to see Qantas new A321 cabins - hopefully they will be at least "interesting" - particularly Bisness Class :-)

Except the VA 737 MAX won't be for "1-2 hour sectors", it will be for short-haul international flights like Bali and Tokyo.

17 Nov 2011

Total posts 27

Was the 737 MAX delivered with the densified cabin already, or will they be going back and adding another row later?

Just wondering if we can rely on the seat pitch numbers and photos shown still being representative following the changes.

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

30 May 2013

Total posts 369

Ah yes, the old "let's bung in an extra row of economy seats, make the seats thinner, reduce armrest width and tell the passenger's it's an enhancement trick." I've seen this many times before and I'm not falling for it.

Virgin Australia - Velocity Rewards

24 Jan 2018

Total posts 688

That's my worry too.  Thank-you.

American Airlines - AAdvantage

13 Jul 2015

Total posts 275

This article is just pandering towards Virgin Australia and their new seats are laughably average at best. This isn't an evolution or a revolution in seats, it's an update at best.

24 Oct 2010

Total posts 2561

'Pandering'? Utter nonsense, mate. We've provided accurate timely reporting on Virgin's long-awaited B737 MAX with our focus on the passenger experience of the seats. And we never claimed the seats are a 'revolution', although clearly they are an 'evolution' and include several welcome passenger improvements while also staying true to Virgin's B737 history and corporate balance sheet. Don't like the new seats? That's fine, that's your call and you can express it here in a constructive way.

31 Jul 2022

Total posts 2

I flew from Darwin to Melbourne on the new seats and actually found them quite comfy. Only gripe I have is the armrests are too thin.

23 Oct 2014

Total posts 230

Not really it’s relevant to the travellers who sit in the seats and fly Virgin, and by the last market share figures VAA has the greatest share of the market, larger than Qantas, larger than Jetstar. So yes plenty of people are keen to read this article I would suspect.

05 Mar 2015

Total posts 418

"and by the last market share figures VAA has the greatest share of the market, larger than Qantas, larger than Jetstar." I find that very hard to believe given that Virgin has never topped a 30% share of the domestic market and flies fewer aircraft on fewer routes than Qantas, so I would very much like to see your source for those 'market share figures'.

23 Oct 2014

Total posts 230

This slimmed down Virgin holds about a 34 per cent share of the domestic market. In the 2022 financial year, the last results it filed to the corporate regulator,


Straight from the AFR 👌 April 2023

Market share - Virgin 34%, Qantas 31 and Jetstar 31%

05 Mar 2015

Total posts 418

Virgin reckons it has a higher market share than Qantas? Sounds like the airline is telling porkies to gild its forthcoming ASX relisting, according to the ACCC "Qantas flew the highest proportion of domestic passengers with 38.0%. Jetstar accounted for 23.1%, Virgin Australia flew 33.6% of all domestic passengers including the highest proportion of passengers on routes connecting 2 larger cities."

Thai Airways International - Royal Orchid Plus

15 Jan 2013

Total posts 469

I really wish they switched to an audio video on demand system with music and movies and TV shows like their partner Singapore Airlines has with KRISWORLD for the seats.the existing system via our phones leaves a lot to be desired.

Virgin Australia - Velocity Rewards

29 Jul 2016

Total posts 5

Ok so something that I've noticed on my travels this month to the US via SEA is NO ONE has made the switch to USB-C I've slowing been changing all my cords and chargers from "A" to "C" and have been caught out this trip. Hoping the updated seats with have C in them and not A!

Thai Airways International - Royal Orchid Plus

15 Jan 2013

Total posts 469

Looking forward to this.I only wish for those of us who use their app device for inflight TV shows and audio they would give us some fresh programming.There is only so much Two Broke Girls or Fuller House episodes one can put up with on sectors that exceed 3 to 8 hours or whatever else they show from the last six to eight years.

JKH
JKH

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

23 Sep 2017

Total posts 162

737 - never exciting and rarely comfortable full-stop.

737 economy - always awful except when you score empty seats next to you.

737 J-class in Australia - always worth a yawn. Can only be worse when in Europe with their Euro ‘business’ class. Perish the thought of an overnight longish flight.


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