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Qantas & Jetstar

The Future of Coffee

17 Discussions

MarkJohnSon Banned

MarkJohnSon Banned

Member since 19 Jan 2018

Total posts 41

Over the past few years, we've borne witness to an incredible transformation: in airline lounges, barista-made coffee has become the "new normal".

This is a very welcome change and it's great to be able to enjoy a quality flat white in modern lounges.


However, while the aviation world has been focused on the provision of barista-made espresso-based coffee, the cafes back in our towns and cities have made some advancements of their own.


It is now de rigueur for any cafe worth its salt to offer a range of brew methods in addition to espresso-based coffee. These methods include the Hario V60, the Kalita Wave and the Chemex.


Personally, I've come to prefer these drip coffees to espresso. The range of flavours offered by a lighter roast and the brew method is incredible: you can enjoy a spectrum of flavours ranging a fruit-forward, acidic coffee from Kenya to a hazelnut and chocolate inspired Brazilian coffee. Furthermore, these coffees are best enjoyed without milk, which is a real plus in a world where lactose intolerance on the rise.


I would love to see an airline like Qantas take the lead in expanding the range of coffee available in their lounges. Another benefit of these alternative methods is that the capital costs of production are low; there are no expensive espresso machines involved. The existing baristas could easily be "upskilled" and taught some new brew methods.


Are there any other filter coffee lovers out there?

xtfer

Virgin Australia - Velocity Rewards

Member since 14 Mar 2017

Total posts 139

Or even, dare I say it, onboard?

tommygun

Delta Air Lines - SkyMiles

Member since 16 Oct 2017

Total posts 115

There are times I just want an "American" coffee - drip brewed and not as strong as something like a long black. So bring on the chemex! Australia seems obsessed with Starbucks flavors and with European coffee styles. Not that 'flat white" would make much sense to anyone in Italy, though I guess it's just a latte served other than in the traditional glass.
That said, drip brewed is what airlines have been stuffing up for years to the point of being undrinkable, so onboard might be a bit aspirational.
The ubiquitous "bottomless" cup in the U.S. is always welcome too.

PeterBla

Member since 16 Oct 2015

Total posts 2

Wen you say drip filter is not as strong as a long black, surprisingly, dip filter coffee has a much higher caffeine level than a long black. This is mainly due doe the short extraction time of a properly made espresso, as opposed to the drip filter which is longer.

tonyw

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

Member since 18 Jul 2015

Total posts 15

One of the problems in flight is that water boils at a lower temperature with lower air pressure.

tommygun

Delta Air Lines - SkyMiles

Member since 16 Oct 2017

Total posts 115

Could just be me, LB seems to taste stronger. I guess a lot of places do double shots as standard. Also a lot of coffee in America is Hawaiian kona, quite a light flavor. Interesting that in France, Cafe Americain is readily available - but not here.

PeterBla

Member since 16 Oct 2015

Total posts 2

The taste or flavour is a consequence of the dark roast. This takes longer than a light roast and in the process, reduces caffeine. And then there is a size of the serve and Arabica vs Robusta. Check out

watson374

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

Member since 17 Aug 2012

Total posts 1,290

[Jeremy Clarkson's outraged voice] Why would you want an American coffee?

Long blacks have a stronger flavour but less caffeine, and that works for me on the ground; on the aircraft, I find that plunger works better, as it's a straightforward process, so a good product and good crew should result in a good cup (and even the current Qantas plunger coffee is drinkable enough).

MarkJohnSon Banned

MarkJohnSon Banned

Member since 19 Jan 2018

Total posts 41

Or even, dare I say it, onboard?

Yes, this would be eminently feasible. In fact, on longer trips I take my coffee kit with me (including drip kettle and portable hand-grinder). I've made coffee on planes and trains - the only challenge is convincing the staff to fill your kettle with boiling water. Can be done.


A flight attendant could be trained to do the same. They could make a large, batch-brew style quantity for the premium cabins. Qantas, for example, could use it as a great way to showcase local Australian roasters and sustainable coffee practices.


Dredgy

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

Member since 02 Apr 2017

Total posts 161

I don’t really drink or enjoy coffee - so a properly made hot chocolate would be welcome.

For coffee, I think an nice touch in a premium cabin would be a personal, miniature French Press. I’ve always liked how Sofitel has done that at their breakfast restaurants.

JJJJJJJ

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

Member since 18 Feb 2017

Total posts 56

I’m afraid I’ve been put off tea and coffee on board since I heard that crew don’t drink it as the water boilers are rarely cleaned and it’s a health hazard. So I would be grateful to see the sticker that tells you when the boiler was last cleaned :)

Covvers

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

Member since 19 Jan 2018

Total posts 64

I’m afraid I’ve been put off tea and coffee on board since I heard that crew don’t drink it as the water boilers are rarely cleaned and it’s a health hazard. So I would be grateful to see the sticker that tells you when the boiler was last cleaned :)

I'm just curious, but do you clean your kettle at home?

I can't say I have ever cleaned my kettle(s) on the basis that presence of boiling water would, in all usual circumstances, keep things free from germs and bacteria. Perhaps things are different with a boiler on an aircraft given they do not always seem to reach boiling temperature (100C/212F), but it seems fine (bordering on absolutely fine) to me.

kimshep

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

Member since 11 Oct 2014

Total posts 314

Innovative or not, you're NOT gonna see major airlines offer the like of Kopi Luwak coffee (that is passed through the digestive system of the Indonesian Civet cat) in any 'premium' cabin. Whilst it is the most expensive coffee on the planet, no manner of 'explanation' or 'provenance' on a menu card would negate the actual method of production.

Covvers

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

Member since 19 Jan 2018

Total posts 64

Innovative or not, you're NOT gonna see major airlines offer the like of Kopi Luwak coffee (that is passed through the digestive system of the Indonesian Civet cat) in any 'premium' cabin. Whilst it is the most expensive coffee on the planet, no manner of 'explanation' or 'provenance' on a menu card would negate the actual method of production.

Sir,

I think Kopi Luwak is a pretty extreme view about what constitutes speciality coffee. There are plenty of locally roasted speciality coffee options that are well within usual price points which would represent a dramatic improvement from what is presently offered in lounges and in the air.

I am talking, in the large part, about a lot of the established "speciality" coffee brands which are common place in any capital city. I am sure many posters would be familiar with these brands. No one, not least the poster, is suggesting that airlines put on Kopi Luwak coffee.

Put simply, if Qantas is presently sourcing their coffee from Vittoria (I believe that still to be the case), it would not be dramatically more expensive to come to some arrangement with one of the many local roasters. Not only would it dramatically improve the quality of the coffee, it would also be support businesses working in a dynamic field rather than stale behemoth like Vittoria.

EKdevotee

Emirates Airlines - Skywards

Member since 05 Jun 2017

Total posts 9

First world problems

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