Dogs and cats may soon travel in the cabin on domestic flights

Instead of putting fido or kitty into the cargo hold, why not book them a seat right next to you?

By David Flynn, June 30 2021
Dogs and cats may soon travel in the cabin on domestic flights

Passengers on flights within Australia may soon be allowed to travel with their pets next to them rather than in the cargo hold below.

The country's aviation regulator plans to relax the rules which currently ban any animal other than designated service dogs from flying in the cabin.

However, it will be up to each airline to decide its own policy for flying with fido, kitty or any other furry, feathered or scaled friend once the new rules come into effect on December 2.

Qantas, Virgin Australia, Jetstar and Regional Express allow service dogs to travel free with their owners, but all other animals must be transported in the cargo hold – a measure that's costly and often distressing for both the pets and their owners.

However, the Civil Aviation Safety Authority suggests a number of factors will need to be considered by the airlines.

"When giving permission, you may need to consider the type of animal and how it is carried, contained and restrained; its reaction to noise and being out of its natural environment; nuisance to other passengers; distraction to flight crew; and how excrement or fluids will be contained," the new CASA rules state.

"A large animal should always be secured so as not to damage or affect the balance of the aircraft in flight," CASA continues.

"A small or medium-sized animal carried in the cabin would normally need as a minimum to be restrained during takeoff and landing and in turbulence."

Many overseas airlines allow pets to accompany their humans in the cabin for a fee, subject to weight restrictions.

Most US carriers charge US$125 (A$165) per pet on one-way domestic flights, while Lufthansa charges €50-€70 (A$80-$110) per pet.

The animal has to be carried in a small ventilated pet carrier which counts as one of your two carry-on bags, and is supposed to be stowed under the seat in front of you – which would prove a tight fit for poodles and pugs, let alone medium-sized dogs.

In response to enquiries this morning by Executive Traveller, Qantas and Jetstar both indicated they have no plans to change their current policies which require that all animals other than recognised service dogs be transported in the cargo hold.

Virgin Australia seems more open to embrace pet-friendly flying, with a spokesperson telling Executive Traveller "we'll consider the regulatory changes as part of a wider pet travel review we're currently undertaking."

Regional Express is also not ruling anything out, with deputy chairman John Sharp suggesting Rex could let passengers buy a second seat for theit pet.

"Already on a lot of airlines you can buy the seat next to you. This could simply be an extension to that, with a section of the aircraft designated for passengers with pets."

ET readers: how would you feel about flying with your dog or cat in the cabin, or sitting next to somebody else's pet?

David

David Flynn is the Editor-in-Chief of Executive Traveller and a bit of a travel tragic with a weakness for good coffee, shopping and lychee martinis.

Joe
Joe

03 May 2013

Total posts 603

Sounds nice in theory but practically this is doomed. Has anyone thought about the terminal, lounges, departure gates, baggage carousel on arrival...water bowels, litter trays, barking, tweeting,,,,,,,,,and the list goes on. The lounges are bad enough at peak times with humans alone!

This is super common in the USA, to see mainly dogs being carried around the airport and on flights, although a lot of the time if they're small dogs they seem to be in a handbag with their little head poking out, rather than in a proper carrier. Never had an issue sitting next to one of these myself, and a lot of the US airports seem to manage pretty well with pet-friendly facilities. I would certainly NOT ever put my dog into the cargo hold, the only way I would have him fly with me would be if he was right next to me so I could help keep him settled.

Absolutely, this is another market segment Oz airlines can expand into. I have a 5 month old golden and he is an absolute gentleman when it comes to travelling and if we are allowed to travel domestically, this will spring up this untapped market and also additional revenue for airlines also other tourism operators in the country. Qantas has this attitude, we don't care. Rex and Virgin, this is your opportunity to grab this furbaby family market share, which generally either drive for holidays or do not take their babies and do shorter holidays. 

Totally agree! Many people drive as they are unable to take their pets with them in the air. There would definitely be a market and I bet those who have been soooo negative to this possibility, probably wouldn't even know if a pet was on board!

20 Oct 2015

Total posts 168

I can't imagine many animals would fit comfortably in a pet carrier which in then shoved under the seat in front, and what about business class like on Qantas' A330 or Boeing 787s where there's no at-seat storage for taxi, take -off and landing so all bags are supposed to go in the overhead locker?

Airlines already let 'plus-sized passengers' buy an empty seat next to them at a reduced rate, it's called a comfort seat, maybe they should adopt the same approach for pets and let passengers buy a 'pet seat' next to them?

17 Feb 2020

Total posts 4

I like animals but sitting next to one on a plane, no thanks. What happens with barking, moving around and having to go to the toilet etc?

when you own one, these questions are auto answered. They are more intuitive than we can think

20 Jun 2020

Total posts 29

Had a dog urinate on the floor in a flight I had in the US a few years ago. It stunk out the whole cabin for the entire flight

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

28 Jul 2011

Total posts 54

I have been wanting this for a long time. For me, my dog would be much better behaved and less of an annoyance than many children or babies we have to deal with on many flights. Not complaining about the children, but I don't see there being too much of a difference really. 

30 Mar 2014

Total posts 15

Absolutely not - if you let your pet sit on the couch at home, that's your own business, but it's unhygienic and has no place on a place. In addition, what about people with allergies to cats or dogs who find themselves stuck close to someone's pet for potentially several hours?

change of seat can always happen, its the attitude that needs an upgrade

30 Mar 2014

Total posts 15

The article says "A small or medium-sized animal carried in the cabin would normally need as a minimum to be restrained during takeoff and landing and in turbulence.", but (i) how do you plan to do this effectively for any animal that is too large to fit in a pet container that can go under the seat in front, and (ii) what about any kind of emergency situation? A panicked animal in a cabin during an evacuation is a major and totally unacceptable safety hazard that could hinder the safe and efficient evacuation of the plane. In addition to the pet’s response, their owner’s likely attempts to look after their pet and evacuate it with them would be an unacceptable hindrance.

14 Oct 2016

Total posts 98

I'd imagine this won't be a free for all in regards to what is allowed but I would kind of expect a pilot program. 

Probably what would happen if they started allowing pets on board is the passenger would acquire an extra seat next to themselves, most likely at the rear of the plane. The animal would have to be transported in a carrier and there would likely be a size limit on how large the animal could be. I could also see an initial restriction on the length of routes. 

05 Mar 2015

Total posts 288

Yes, I think airlines could do much worse than to trial a program along these lines and then invite feedback from passengers on each flight where there were pets. Qantas certainly has the technology to do this, looking at the surveys it already sends after some flights, and it would be better to trial the concept than just launch it across all flights.

09 Aug 2015

Total posts 85

A lot of people raising issues here, but a lot of overseas airlines have been letting dogs travel in the cabin for decades now, so they've clearly found a way to address these problems?

05 Mar 2015

Total posts 288

I agree they have found some solutions, including working with airports to set up areas where dogs can be encouraged to do their thing before the flight, I remember SFO as having a great facility like this! But there are still clearly some issues with the behavior of pets on board, going by what people have experienced on flights in the USA for example.

Not on the overseas airlines I fly (flew, at the moment) with!

05 Mar 2015

Total posts 288

I would rather sit near a dog or cat than a crying baby!

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

09 Feb 2015

Total posts 2

Or most humans for that matter :-)

25 Jun 2021

Total posts 4

100% agree with that one. 

Virgin Australia - Velocity Rewards

24 Jan 2018

Total posts 468

A dummy dipped in honey almost always works.  Babies crying is typically an ear irritation from height change on take-off.  The sucking action tends to 'equalize' and relieve the pressure causing pain.  I say 'typically', because only once has this not worked (I suspect the poor child may have been crook with something else).  

Full Disclosure:  My wife (a nurse) taught me this when - before children - I queried why she had a packaged dummy and portion control pack of honey in her carry-on.  At the time, I was relieved with that reason.  

11 Jul 2018

Total posts 2

God no, it’s rolling back in the US and shouldn’t be introduced. Service animals only. 

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

11 Oct 2014

Total posts 636

@Matt2 - Thankfully someone is following what is happening in the USA !

The current US legislation regarding Service Animals is not changing. As is should be - and Australia already supports the carriage of Service Animals on our carriers.

Thankfully, the bit that IS changing in the USA is the heavily abused category of "Emotional Support Animals". This policy has been a major point of contention ever since it was announced years ago. 

Virtually any type of 'pet' is required to be accepted as an ESA for in-cabin carriage, provided its size is considered "reasonable / appropriate". This has led to the idiocy of people seeking to bring on-board animals as diverse as a miniature horse (United Airlines), pet reptiles (nothing like a snake to freak the cabin out) .. and numerous types of birds, including macaws. There have also been instances of outsize huge Swiss mountain Rescue dogs ( and I was "lucky" enough to witness one in 2019 ex Dallas on an AA flight). Friendly, massive, quiet and adorable dog - but dribbled drool over the carpet where it was sequestered between the owner's legs.

Problem is that whilst the USA and airlines require "registration" certificates for emotional support animals before carriage, these can be bought on-line across various internet sites and are more than often fraudulent. Part of the reason that the US carriers have sought to unwind this situation is the constant and routine proffering of fraudulent certificates for passenger pets and the possibility of offending repeat (human) customers. Not to mention that the normal passenger load seems equally divided on the issue of travelling with someone else's "Fido" or "Fluffy" sharing an adjacent seat.

I've seen both sides of the spectrum on flights within the USA and sometimes it sure ain't pretty. Everyone loves to think that THEIR pet is immaculately behaved, cute and adorable - that's just life, But wait until said 80lb dog  who has just finished two tins of pre-flight Pal .. lets a huge one ([email protected]) drop in the middle of the Y cabin. Or has an emergency toilet break - without being able to get to the rear of the cabin by itself. That is when you'll wish you were on another flight.

QF, VA and Rex would be wise to maintain their existing policies, IMHO. There are passengers that become frightened or at least extremely nervous travelling on aircraft - why would you wish to bestow a similar set of feelings on an untrained animal whose lack of understanding of their surroundings may be evident? But then, we do let some humans fly .. without knowing their behaviour.

Just because someone else is rolling back, we don't have to follow them. Tap and Go was introduced in KL way before it was introduced in Aus. It took off like crazy in Oz where as it was rolled back in MY, this is way back in 2007. So, moral of the story, horses for courses

XWu
XWu

09 May 2020

Total posts 415

@ culinarycalc

I do not think using technology as an example of roll back is appropriate.

A policy being rolled back is usually it is not practical or the need for the policy no longer exist. The latter is the basis for the (non-service) animals policy on airplane

A rule involving technology being rolled back is either when the technology is not working properly or new technology superseded the technology involved. For example, the rule about using phone/wifi on the airplane.

BTW Touch and go technology is alive and well in many south East Asian countries, including MY itself. In fact Australia’s slow move into contactless technology is a national embarrassment considering contactless card payment for public  transport has been in use in 1997, at least 5-7 years after SG started it.

Australian capital cities public transport only had contactless card payment only about 10 years ago.

We had been the forefront of the word in smartcard trials for payment in 1993. It is said we are no longer the smart country we billed ourselves to be. Most famous Aussie inventions that changed the world were between 1960s to 1995 including cochlear implants, wifi, ultrasound etc. 

XWu
XWu

09 May 2020

Total posts 415

Sorry I meant

 contactless card payment for public  transport in MY has been in use in 1997, at least 5-7 years after SG started it.’

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

26 May 2014

Total posts 456

I flew Melbourne to Perth a couple of years ago sitting next to a blind person with her new guide dog.  The dog was on the floor in front of the window seat and was perfectly behaved for the whole flight.  I was quite amazed to see how quickly the dog had bonded to his new human.  I see this as an exception and don't think pets should travel with owners in the cabin. 

XWu
XWu

09 May 2020

Total posts 415

@ GregXL

I am sure you are aware service animals are carefully selected to be well behaved.

Many trainee guide dogs failed because of their attitude and personality, those who fail end up being someone’s pet.

Same for working animals, including sniffer dogs and police dogs (I never seen or heard of a working cat in these area)

There are a few nice documentaries on how a guide dog get trained, I strongly recommend watching some of them

It is hard to explain when one does not have a pet. I have just had my dog dog for 4 months and rarely he would do something when he has been told "no" twice. Yes, he needs that re-enforcement, but after that, he would sit down and not do anything until told, 'its ok'. Anyway, we as a society, need to be inclusive and see ourselves, in someone else' shoes. We months ago, I was across the fence, remember!!!! 

31 Mar 2014

Total posts 364

As someone who is allergic to cats/dogs, and have seen too many people who can't take responsibility over their pets, this is a hard pass for me. 

QF

11 Jul 2014

Total posts 628

On a flight from Zurich to LA I had a lady with her dog under the seat in a basket, only barked once. Everyone on the flight were amused along with US customs upon arrival. I can't see this working in Australia but I do feel sorry for the animals in the cargo hold. On a flight Townsville to Sydney last month a poor dog barked all the way, it was very clearly heard from the main cabin from the cargo hold below.

Virgin Australia - Velocity Rewards

24 Jan 2018

Total posts 468

Pets in the hold are meant to have been given a body-weight-based mild sedative beforehand.  That the dog barked tells me it wasn't given one. 

Lmc
Lmc

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

09 Nov 2018

Total posts 97

Oh please no.... and when they need to urinate or worse???? And the people that need to sit around these pets? 

A service dog serves an important purpose, other animals need to go in the hold. 

P1
P1

24 Apr 2017

Total posts 76

Whatever airlines in Australia allow pets in the cabin WON'T be getting any business from me!

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

28 Jul 2011

Total posts 54

Will suck for you if they all do it....

21 Jun 2018

Total posts 8

OMG, just 'no' - the article made me chuckle.  As per Matt2 and kimshep, I've found it entertaining to follow the mishaps and complexities with allowing animals on planes in the US and the recent return to 'only service animals' - seriously, airlines appears to be barely able to cope with some of the minimal adjustments required for 'social distancing' on planes during Covid - they're honestly not equipped to manage the complexities of animals on planes (from reading about this in the US, there are quite a few layers to it and it just gets out of hand) --- I guess if we're 'just going to stick to' small pets in small ventilated containers, I guess that's possible, but it feels like even that could lead to complexities airlines aren't equipped to deal with.  Btw, I am a dog lover and have 2 small dogs that would probably meet 'small pet' criteria, but I still don't think it's a prudent idea.

XWu
XWu

09 May 2020

Total posts 415

Never had pets in the cargo hold before but I am guessing the box the small dogs are in is going to be a lot bigger than the one you can bring into the cabin, and larger box for larger animals, all of them allowing them to stand inside the box. 

Even for a small dog or cat the size of box allowed to carry barely fit the animals and as they are not going to be allowed to be in the overhead locker, they can only be under the seat. In the cattle class I barely have space for my legs after I put my laptop bag under the seat, so unless that lady travel by F or J class, or she had a small frame it must be quite uncomfortable for her for the long trip. Imagine her pet stuck inside a small box unable to stand for 12 hours

My uni student son still has a dog phobia after an unpleasant encounter with an aggressive dog larger than him, when he was a small child. My uni student daughter has a cat hair, and to a lesser extent a dog hair allergy. I can't imagine any airline's much vaunted HEPA air filtration system preventing allergens emanating from pets floating through the cabin before being filtered. Also (admittedly a sidetrack), none of these animals are native species, so should they be permitted in Australia at all (as pets), given the harm they inflict on indigenous species?

I believe that an aeroplane cabin is not a place for pets, and would not willingly travel in their company.

Perhaps Rex could offer dog-only flights?

25 Jun 2021

Total posts 4

What a great idea. A pet and owner flight only.  Now only if i could take the hounds with me in Emirates biz class, would be cool having a drink at the bar with them entertaining everyone. 

21 Jun 2018

Total posts 8

@parishiltons - that made me laugh - fantastic!

29 Nov 2019

Total posts 3

Having flown with our Aussie Terrier  in the USA in the passenger section in a secure lightweight carrier under the seat in front  , and then subjecting her to cargo from the USA to Australia, and many  additional domestic flights here,  I would welcome the idea. Obviously every animal and circumstances are different, so I can understand the potential issues that could arise on occasions but given the very high dog ownership in Australia, I'm sure that the majority would embrace the idea.  

Also, with the current travel restrictions and outrageous  price gouging($800+ per flight vs +$150 previously )   by companies outsourced  to sell an animal spot on Virgin/Qantas select flights  "due to the pandemic", allowing animals in the cabin, would make life so much easier/less stressful  for those of us having to move around at short notice and make things much more affordable.

21 Jun 2018

Total posts 8

@Davidusa - I empathise and understand why you'd prefer to have them in the cabin and one of my puppies was potentially quite traumatised by flying in cargo in Australia, BUT I think there's a real issue (just as a starter) around how you reduce the impact on other passengers, who for instance, might have allergies to pets, or for instance, if the animal is unsettled by the flight and creates unpleasant odours etc --- I'm not sure that I can be convinced that the potential impact on others (and more importantly safety considerations in case of an emergency on a plane) can overcome these issues.  Maybe there are some clever ways to overcome some of these issues that I'm unaware of...

24 Jun 2020

Total posts 13

Maybe we could implement a new class of travel, called "cattle class" for pets only because flying on some flights with Qantas in recent years is a bit like that at times (in economy I mean)

Virgin Australia - Velocity Rewards

04 Sep 2015

Total posts 15

Service dogs fine, anything else no way ! As a Platinum/ Gold member of Virgin , I-hope they  do not go down this crazy path.

Velocity Platinum

08 Jul 2011

Total posts 12

I was initially suspicious that my thoughts were wrong but I now realise that the world has definitely gone mad! Animals in aircraft? Who thought this idea up?

22 Mar 2013

Total posts 5

I love my dogs and have flown them in the hold dozens of times but...yeah...no thanks. 

A much simpler solution would be to allow us to check their crates in as excess baggage at the terminal itself, rather than have to go through middleman freight companies that charge a 300% markup just to get in the way. 

Pre-Covid we were almost there, with a reasonable fee to add a pet to the flight you're on. Though some terminals like Canberra and Adelaide didn't allow even pets in crates to be checked in at the terminal, which is kind of silly and added unnecessary complications.

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

24 Apr 2015

Total posts 7

Everyone has mentioned the obvious issues of pets defecating during the flight, but what about animals vomiting, possible  during stress, panic or turbulence, etc. Even if they are in a cage that will capture and contain body fluids and excrement, the cage can't contain the smell of vomit - a very unpleasant smell to deal with.

23 Oct 2017

Total posts 4

I'm sure everyone has been around a dog when its passed wind. If I was in business class and that happened I would be very upset.  Leave the animals at home please or in the cargo hold and consider other passengers.  

10 Feb 2012

Total posts 10

Just a Thought:

Problem solved for all the Non animal lovers (to which Im not one). Why not only have 1 or 2 flights a day, marked as pet only flights. Allows for all the non wanting of animal people to choose other flights. Same as Trains. Have only one or two carriages. Even Some airlines do child free zones. I would be so happy to pay for a seat for my 10kg dog (who is so well behaved), and have an option of 1 or 2 flights only a day. That I would definitely sacrifice a time for.

It is one reason I can't fly as much as I'd like to anymore. It is hard to get your fur baby looked after properly (let alone someone you trust), and the horror stories of animal deaths having occurred in the cargo hold/on tarmac, have been horrendous of late/past. (Eg. Sometimes pilots even forget to turn the temperature on in the cargo hold, thus it drops below -18 degrees). Friends in the Airline industry have shared many of these horror stories with me.  Hence why, many of us are not wanting to put our pets through the stress of a cargo hold. 

Another solution is, You could have the animals in a portable harness seat or cage that sits on the middle seat (safely attached). The animal just wants to be with their family and visa versa. The stress of abandonment for them is really awful. Hence why they howl or scream in a cargo hold etc. Passengers with animals could load through a different arrangement to other passengers, who are willing to pay for the privilege of having their animal with them. You could even have specific flight attendants who are trained in animal safety and health of animals. Im sure there would be many takers. So much opportunity. 

Basically there are many solutions that could be solved, so everyone can still enjoy the benefits of flying. Until they bring in a fast train ??? Eg. Hotels are starting to allow for pet friendly rooms. We are a country that depends on flying, considering we are only 25 million people, yet live a huge demographic, thus the airlines are missing a big Chunk of a market that's already hesitant to get back on a plane these days. Covid has seen a huge increase of animals being purchased and the zoom/covid era is now competing. I would see this as amazing opportunity for an airline. Frequent Flyer points, Confirmed seats, Animal treats sold on menu, renting a seat or carriage cage etc etc. Huge Money maker.  As long as the airline looks outside the square and balances health safety for all first, It really could work. You might even have less crying babies/kids, as they love their pets. 

Just a Thought.

Etihad - Etihad Guest

07 Jun 2019

Total posts 3

I like animals but am severely allergic to them. I would definitely think twice about flying if there was potential of being stuck on a flight with a dog or cat or even on a plane where they've previously been (any animal hair on a seat etc would give me an allergic reaction).

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer - Chairmans Lounge

01 Sep 2011

Total posts 398

I certainly hope this does not happen.  It has been exploited in the USA and now they are trying to reign it in. As much as I love and adore the family dog, I wouldn't want him or any other animal in the cabin and definitely not in the business or first cabins.

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

26 Nov 2012

Total posts 83

Uggghhhhh. (What I’d really like to say would probably get me banned from this forum). 

We’ve banned smokers because it’s harmful to others, we’ve dealt with peanuts, so I ask, what about people allergic to animals?  

21 Jun 2018

Total posts 8

well, I guess those people just shouldn't fly, should they... (joking of course, but couldn't resist...)

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

09 Sep 2013

Total posts 181

I hope they don't even countenance the idea, and as the Yanks have found, once the egg has been scrambled, it's all too hard to unscramble it...

08 Aug 2017

Total posts 45

I’m amazed at the negativity around this. I’ve flown many times across the Atlantic, and transcontinental US, and around Europe, in close proximity to (other people’s) dogs and cats. And I’m allergic to cats. And I’ve never had a problem. There were clearly rules and protocols about what size animals, how they are carried, etc etc. and the rules always seemed to work. I’m all for it as long as the airline manages it properly. And frankly I can’t see Qantas and Virgin putting large, shitting Dalmatians in the aisles, so perhaps let the proof of this one be in the pudding! 

XWu
XWu

09 May 2020

Total posts 415

How many pets can be well behaved in a crowded room full of people?

Some pax are already hogging shared spaces in the seats armrests and under the seats, where do the regulators think the animals is going to be if the pet owners did not buy a neighbouring seat?

Considering the level of supervision of children by certain parents in airplanes, I would expect the same proportion of pet owner having the same lack of responsibility and respect for fellow travellers 

It’s a small proportion, but enough to make life hell for the entire flight 

Worse, I would bet when the animals go feral the few entitled pet owners would point to flight attendants to sort things out.

It is madness that we considering this option while large US  airlines are moving away from this.

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

01 Jul 2021

Total posts 1

I am also amazed at the hyper negativity around this. Especially when so many great ideas have already been put forward by users (trial periods, dedicated pet flights once or twice a day, dog harnesses and seats, etc) not to mention the learnings from years and years of pets travelling in cabins across the USA and all over Europe. I’ve seen animals trotting on leads through airports and sat nearby to them on several occasions and never even noticed them. I would love to know the demographic of users on here who subscribe to “Executive Traveller”, from the comments about their fear of a smelling a dog fart in Business Class to those touting their frequent flyer tier status as some sort of threat to those airlines who would consider this, I’m guessing they are not representative of the wider Australian population, of which, according to APH statistics, over 61% of households have a pet and mostly being dogs and cats. It would be interesting to see the feedback on other forums. This is a wonderful idea and with thorough review of learnings from overseas carriers, careful planning and trials, there’s no reason a successful program can’t be rolled out. 

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

26 Nov 2012

Total posts 83

Maybe the volume of negative feedback reflects the community’s true feelings on the subject. 

21 Jun 2018

Total posts 8

@BatteryBen - it sounds like you've always had positive experiences around flying with animals, which is great.  Unfortunately, it's probably the situation that a few specific incidents have really stood-out in the US, and more importantly, it appears to have become enough of an issue in the US for them to restrict their orientation back towards service animals, which is telling.

@Lucya82 - the question is WOULD Aust airlines do thorough learnings from overseas and make careful planning and trials and also, would they carefully think through any noticeable negative impact on other travellers --- in my view, airlines have struggled to adopt simple social distancing processes during a pandemic - I'm not confident in their ability to implement the complexities of pets on planes well.

Air New Zealand - Airpoints

21 Jan 2016

Total posts 197

I think we have to look at the real issue why pets other than 'service dogs' who are trained, are not allowed in the cabin, is in event of an emergency, a cabin must be evacuated within 90 seconds. If a passenger wants to fly with their untrained 'pet'  come down to the decision - do you save your 'pet' and stop over people from leaving the cabin or leave your pet behind.

I prefer pets not to be carried in the cabin over then trained 'service dogs' due to flight safety and I think any cabin crew would agree with me. Cabin crew have enough problems with humans and they don't want have to up with issues of untrained pets. as well.

I'm sure there would be a limit to the number per flight, probably two and/or specific flights each day that allow pets. Also the size would be taken into account. I see no problems with it and the majority of pets would be far, far better behaved then some of the arrogant and rude, and often aggressive behaviour, I have experienced recently when flying domestically. I'd certainly prefer to sit next to someone with a pet then some I have sat near recently!

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

18 Apr 2013

Total posts 2

Totally ridiulous!!!

Pets have been travelling in cargo holds forever and have been just fine - forever! 

I'm a platinum business flyer and allergic to cat hair; what am I supposed to do? So I should be inconvenienced because an owner doesn't want his pet to be stressed. Seriously! 

And that whole service dog thing in the US - don't even go there. You can get a certificate online with NO qualifiying. I own rental properties there and a 21 year old med student applied - despite the ad being no pets and my having brand new hardwood floors, I could not deny her application because she had a service dog. She was 20 at the time of rental - please explain how a 20 year old med student could require a service dog. 

TOTALLY AGAINST THIS! Not fair to all of us with allergies or to the person who to a business traveller that is asked to sit next to a pet on a 5 hour flight to Perth. 

NO WAY!!!!!!!!

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

06 Dec 2017

Total posts 22

I hope there will be some way to find out in advance which carriers are falling for this and which are not - I will abandon QF (am a very loyal Platinum FF) if they go with this nonsense.  

I don't want someone's smelly noisy dog sitting next to me.

QF

11 Jul 2014

Total posts 628

I don't think any Australian Airline would be game to have pets onboard after reading all these comments

Virgin Australia - Velocity Rewards

24 Jan 2018

Total posts 468

What on earth was poor Jayne thinking . . . (assuming she was) ?

XWu
XWu

09 May 2020

Total posts 415

@ UpUpAndAway

The comments and responses to this proposal is like cats and dogs…

23 Jul 2017

Total posts 77

A carriage on a British train was abandoned when someone's Fido did a whoopsy. It's easy to change carriages, but where do passengers go if that happened on a plane? Talk about embarrassed owner! At least he tried to clean up the mess. YOU may love your pet, but others do not. Animals (excepting service dogs) have travelled in the plane cargo sections for years, so what's the sudden interest about taking doggies and moggies in the cabin now? What's changed? The animal is your pet and you care for it, but call it what you will, it's not a "baby".

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

22 May 2018

Total posts 36

Apparently Virgin have been doing on-line surveys on this subject and have had a lot of feedback from pet owners. Don't know whether they are flyers or more so frequent flyers. Stick to it fellas.. I don't and won't fly with you and I would expect that a lot of your frequent flyers will be switching.

XWu
XWu

09 May 2020

Total posts 415

For an online survey, particularly posted via social media) Supporters for a new initiative are more likely to respond than those who opposed it (but rely on other people to respond to advocate for status quo)

So if there is a proper questionnaire sent out to the those in QF and VA frequent flyers database, I would suggest those who are passionate about their stance participate in them and even advocate others to respond to these surveys. 

However the airlines should consider giving more emphasis to those repeat customers (ie higher tier and more frequent travel) than the odd casual flyers whose loyalty are more influenced by pricing than the quality/brand of service 

Jetstar Airways - Qantas Frequent Flyer

24 Aug 2018

Total posts 90

Fine; as long as the dog or cat sits in the middle seat, I will claim the armrests....no arguments!


Hi Guest, join in the discussion on Dogs and cats may soon travel in the cabin on domestic flights