Review: Qantas A220 business, economy class

What can travellers expect on board the QantasLink Airbus A220?

By David Flynn, February 22 2024
Review: Qantas A220 business, economy class

There’s an all-new Qantas plane taking to the skies from March 1 as the QantasLink Airbus A220 makes its long-awaited debut on the Melbourne-Canberra and Melbourne-Brisbane routes.

A pair of A220s will take over from the Boeing 717 on selected flights between those capital cities, and more routes will follow as the next wave of A220s arrive.

Here’s the rollout:

  • Melbourne-Canberra (March 1)
  • Melbourne-Brisbane (March 1)
  • Melbourne-Hobart (July 2024)
  • Melbourne-Coffs Harbour (October 2024)
  • Melbourne-Launceston (November 2024)

Qantas has signed on the dotted line for 29 Airbus A220s to be delivered by 2027, with at least seven of the factory-fresh jets due to be in the hangars by mid-2025.

“It’s going to be a game-changer for Qantas” enthuses CEO Vanessa Hudson, "with a new customer experience, new seats, WiFi, bigger overhead compartments for baggage and much larger windows so the cabin environment is much better” than the 717. 

The modern A220 will replace the ageing Boeing 717s as the  workhorse of the QantasLink fleet for key regional and intercity routes (more QantasLink E190s leased from Alliance Airlines will also step up).

While Qantas has previously maintained the final Boeing 717 would fly away in June 2024, the airline confirmed it has since pushed that exit back to the fourth quarter of 2024 – by which time three more A220s will have arrived, bringing the flying tally to five.

And with the A220s having twice the range of the Boeing 717s they replace, as more jets join the QantasLink fleet they’re expected to open up “new domestic routes... that may not have been commercially viable before,” says Hudson, given the inherent efficiencies of the new A220 over the older 717

“These aircraft have the potential to change the way our customers travel across the country, with the ability to connect any two cities or towns in Australia.”

Qantas expects to have all 29 QantasLink A220s by 2027.
Qantas expects to have all 29 QantasLink A220s by 2027.

Hudson also hinted the A220 would feature on the Qantas schedule for the new Western Sydney airport due to open in late 2026, describing the nimbly efficient jet as as “a perfect aircraft for Western Sydney.”

Qantas has committed to basing an initial five jets at the new 24-hour airport.

“The 220 will be a great vehicle to start up Qantas operations” at Western Sydney, Hudson added, tipping “I expect you will see triangle operations” from Western Sydney to Melbourne and Brisbane. 

So what can passengers on the QantasLink A220 expect? Here’s an exclusive first look from Executive Traveller.

Review: Qantas A220 business class

The QantasLink A220 sports ten business class seats (two fewer business class seats than the Boeing 717) in a 2-2 arrangement, with two rows on the left side of the cabin and three rows on the right. 

The QantasLink A220 seat map.
The QantasLink A220 seat map.

The QantasLink A220 business class seats – supplied by Recaro, styled by David Caon and finished in a deep burgundy – are broadly on par with those of the Boeing 737, although benefitting from a modern design that’s more comfortable plus nooks for stowing small items.

The Qantas A220 business class seat.
The Qantas A220 business class seat.

Qantas’ A220 business class seat pitch is 37” with a 5” recline, with calf rest and footrests.

The Qantas A220 business class seat.
The Qantas A220 business class seat.

The seat itself measures 20” from edge to edge – one inch more than its 717 equivalent.

As first reported by Executive Traveller, there’s no seatback video screen – instead, passengers can perch their tablet or smartphone on a fold-out ‘personal device holder’ shelf.

There’s also a very small smartphone stand built into one half of the fold-out tray table.

You can stream movies and TV shows from the Qantas library over WiFi, or of course enjoy your own content either stored on the device or from online streaming services such as Netflix, as the A220 uses the Qantas WiFi satellite system for Internet access that’s both fast (~15Mbps) and free.

To keep your tech topped up during the flight, each Qantas A220 business class seat boasts a pair of high-power USB-C and USB-A outlets, along with a smartphone wireless charging pad, although there you don’t get standard AC sockets.

The front row of the QantasLink A220 business class cabin has somewhat limited room to stretch your legs out, due to the bulkhead row just in front.

 

Rows 2 and 3 are superior for the stretch with the footrest out of your way.

Review: Qantas A220 economy class

The QantasLink A220 has 127 economy class seats, also from Recaro and styled by David Caon, with woollen weave fabric covers subtly mixing charcoal and seagrass. 

The 18” wide seats are set at a 30” pitch and arranged in a 2-3 layout.

The Qantas A220 economy class seat.
The Qantas A220 economy class seat.

This puts two seats down the left side of the plane and three across the aisle on the right (so there are fewer of the dreaded middle seats).

In addition, the first six rows on the left are extra legroom seats at a 34” pitch – so if you want a bit more space to stretch out, look to choose the A or C seat in rows 4 through 9.

Here’s how the legroom compares between those dozen seats (on the left) versus the standard A220 economy seat legroom (on the right). 

But expect to pay extra, with all A220 extra legroom seats (including the emergency exit at row 12) currently showing a $30 surcharge on the Melbourne-Canberra route, in keeping with practice on selecting the Boeing 717’s exit row.

Even so, the re-shaped seatback offers sufficient wiggle-room for passengers, especially at knee-level.

Also read: How to unlock the best Qantas seats using the ‘T-80’ rule

Between the business and economy cabins is a small ceiling-hanging divider...

... which also serves up extra legroom for passengers in row 4 (the front row of economy), although the architecture of the business class seats still gets in the way.

As in business class, the Qantas A220 economy seats have no inflight entertainment (IFE) screen, but each passengers gets a smartphone/tablet holder along with high-power USB-C and USB-A sockets.

However, economy passengers enjoy a hidden bonus over business class: there's an AC power socket shared between every two seats.

And of course, every A220 passenger from tip to tail can access free WiFi.

So how serious a shortcoming is Qantas’ decision not to install inflight entertainment (IFE) video screens on its A220s?

After all, the Boeing 717s never had them – and at least the A220 delivers WiFi, which was sorely missing from the 717s.

It can also be argued that the typically short regional routes of the A220 make seatback screens less of a priority.

Among other major airlines flying the A220, three – Air France, Korean Air and Swiss – have made the same decision to forego seatback screens.

This not only reduces weight by an estimated 150-200kg to increase fuel efficiency and reduce operating costs on a per-plane per-flight basis, it also means there’s one less thing to go wrong and be repaired (if rebooting the entire plane-full of screens doesn’t fix the problem). 

What it’s like to fly on the Qantas A220

Executive Traveller joined Qantas on the inaugural QantasLink A220 flight from Sydney to Uluru, in recognition of Pitjantjatjara artist Maringka Baker, whose paintings inspired the unique livery of this first A220.

And if you’ve ever flown on an Airbus A350, stepping on board the Qantas A220 will carry comfortable echos of familiarity.

From the modern cabin and large easy-to-operate overhead bins to subtle LED lighting patterns, the A220 is like a fun-sized Airbus A350.

“We love that comparison,” laughs Connor Buott, Marketing Manager for Airbus’ single-aisle jets such as the A220 and A320 families.

“You have the same level of technology in both planes, the same innovations such as the use of composite carbon-fibre materials,” he tells Executive Traveller.

“You have the same advanced engine technology which gives you not just fuel efficiency but a lower noise level.”

The first thing we noticed is how large the cabin feels – there’s a surprising sense of openness and space which belies the plane’s compact dimensions.

The A220’s windows add to this: in addition to being noticeably taller that those of the Boeing 717 they’re set higher in the fuselage, with the net effect of bringing more natural light into the cabin.

The choice of soft relaxed colours in the economy seats contributes to the sense of ‘lightness’ in the cabin, as does the way the deep overhead bins curve up towards the ceiling.

And it’s hard to understate how quiet the A220 is: even on take-off, it’s not much louder than a 717 at cruise altitude.

Buott explains the A220’s cabin is lined with special insulation and sound-deadening materials, “and even the environmental control system and the air conditioning have been tweaked to reduce the noise of airflow within the cabin.”

The A220’s overhead bins have room enough for one standard-sized roller bag per passenger – an established sore point on the Boeing 717 – and they swing down lower than you might expect, making it easier to load and unload those bags.

In short, there’s nothing not to love about flying on the A220, especially if you’re used to the Boeing 717.

After all, it’s worth remembering that the 717 was designed in the mid-90s, some 30 years ago. It’s still a solid little jet, with plenty of airlines still flying it.

The A220 is simply a newer design, so it’s like trading up from your reliable old ‘daily driver’ car to the very latest model.

The A220 also has the benefit of being a ‘clean sheet’ plane designed from scratch – although not by Airbus but Canadian business jet manufacturer Bombardier.

In a bold gamble to reimagine the regional jet, Bombardier created what it called the C Series: the first completely new single-aisle airplane in its segment in over 40 years.

The first C Series was handed over to Swiss Air in 2016, and Airbus cannily acquired a majority share in the C Series program in 2018, rebranding the jet as the A220 to complement its existing  portfolio.

The first Qantas A220

The very first Qantas Airbus A220 is dressed in a striking ‘Flying Art’ Aboriginal paint scheme developed in collaboration with First Nations artists and Indigenous Australian design agency Balarinji.

The first QantasLink A220, wrapped in its colourful Flying Art livery.
The first QantasLink A220, wrapped in its colourful Flying Art livery.

Around 100 painters were involved in completing the livery, working with 130 stencils to replicate a detailed design by Pitjantjatjara artist Maringka Baker which tells the Dreaming story of two sisters who traverse remote Australia together, covering vast distances to find their way home.

A fisheye camera lens in the Airbus paintshop makes the compact A220 seem a lot bigger.
A fisheye camera lens in the Airbus paintshop makes the compact A220 seem a lot bigger.

In the tradition of the Qantas Flying Art series, the aircraft itself is named for the artwork Minyma Kutjara Tjukurpa – which literally means ‘the two sisters creation story’ – although all subsequent A220s will be named after native Australian wildlife, as voted for by travellers.

Those names will include koala, Tasmanian devil, sugar glider, platypus, rainbow lorikeet and crimson rosella.

In this one-off design, Qantas' iconic red tail becomes a green tail.
In this one-off design, Qantas' iconic red tail becomes a green tail.

The Qantas Flying Art series was launched in 1994 with the unveiling of the first Indigenous livery aircraft: a Boeing 747 jumbo jet named Wunala Dreaming.

The Boeing 747 'Wunala Dreaming' was the first jet in the Qantas 'Flying Art' series.
The Boeing 747 'Wunala Dreaming' was the first jet in the Qantas 'Flying Art' series.

Later additions to the Flying Art family included a Boeing 737 and Boeing 787 Dreamliner.

Leading Indigenous Australian design agency Balarinji has worked with Qantas to create the fuselage design for all Flying Art liveries.
Leading Indigenous Australian design agency Balarinji has worked with Qantas to create the fuselage design for all Flying Art liveries.

  

International Qantas A220 flights

Being able to fly twice the distance of the Boeing 717 not only brings all of Australia under the A220’s wings, it adds scope for short-range international A220 flights to the likes of New Zealand and key Asia-Pacific destinations – although for now, Qantas is clearly talking up the A220 as a domestic jet.

But its 6,300km range opens up the possibility of flights to Asia from Adelaide – a city that’s long been left off Qantas’ international map – while Perth’s impressive A220 radius encompasses Bali, Jakarta, Bangkok, Phuket, Manila, Kuala Lumpur, Singapore and Phnom Penh.

“We talk a lot about the versatility of the A220 when we're pitching it to airlines,” reveals Airbus exec Buott.

For example, Air Canada flies its A220s on both the hour-long dash between Toronto and Montreal and the six-hour journey from Montreal to Los Angeles.

And with a total of 29 Airbus A220s on order, there remains the possibility that a large number of these jets might be flown by Qantas (rather than QantasLink) on short-range overseas routes – but would that mean a second configuration with seatback video screens?

Probably not. Qantas’ Executive Manager of Product & Service Phil Capps indicates to Executive Traveller that screens won’t appear in any ‘international’ version of the Qantas A220.

“The main concentration from my side is making sure that the customer experience is bang on and we want to make sure we’re enabling that to fly right to the extent of the (aircraft’s) range.”

“We know this aircraft will be predominantly on short- and medium-haul domestic routes, but in designing everything from seats to galleys to the bathrooms to entertainment, we wanted to make sure we can kind of future-proof and network-proof it, if and when new route network opportunities come up.

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

21 Jan 2014

Total posts 320

What QF haven’t advised is what they will be doing with all the E190 they will acquire with the Alliance takeover and whether or not they will be part of the fleet along with these new planes, if these are to replace the 717 only then once again QF will have two different standard of service across various routes, the E190 with absolutely no on board features at all and these new planes with everything you could ask for, where is the consistency.

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

10 Apr 2012

Total posts 316

Would the E190 be used for FIFO/Charter, and A220 used for Regional/Domestic?  The inconsistency of product will definitely be annoying if they mix it.

Virgin Australia - Velocity Rewards

24 Jan 2018

Total posts 717

Looks great !   Kudos to Qantas.

Keen to try these out but as always I worry about the leg space on Qantas 

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer P1

23 Aug 2014

Total posts 140

Flew it last month out of Switzerland

Lovely aircraft

Interesting to watch the evolution of Qantas slowly becoming a preferredl Airbus carrier 

22 Sep 2017

Total posts 81

The large cabin baggage bins fit with Qantas’s more generous allowance, which in turn should help alleviate the baggage handling staff shortages.

28 Apr 2021

Total posts 22

An excellent article and a very descriptive outline on a new Aircraft that should indeed be a 'game changer' for Qantas.

How refreshing to see the reference "Passenger" being used as this is the correct terminology for travelers, rather than the dreary word 'customer' that Qantas struggles to ditch.

26 Mar 2020

Total posts 67

I prefer to be called a "customer" as after all, I am paying to be onboard.

It's no different than a hotel using the word "guests" as opposed to "occupants"  - it psychologically helps staff provide better customer service.

23 Mar 2020

Total posts 5

.. love the old Boeing 717s used for MEL-CBR trips by Qantas, always fun on approach to Canberra as you come over the hills on a summers day. The updrafts are a free rollercoaster on the way in.

So certainly looking forward to something new. Have just done a number of long haul legs on the A350.. and nice! quiet, smooth, comfy seats... so the A220 has to be an improvement on the 717 for us who do quick trips to Canberra

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

20 Mar 2014

Total posts 4

Just try to reach the passenger service unit from the aisle seat on the right side - cannot be done without standing. Personally, I'll take the Embraer models any day of the week, and choose to frequently as JetBlue flies both aircraft from Boston to Florida here in the States, a route I travel frequently. A220's economics are great, however the comfort factor lags considerably.

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

09 Jan 2017

Total posts 28

What a great little aircraft.  If only Qantas would use it to replace the awful DeHavilland Dash 8s on regional routes too.

Runway length shouldn't be an issue - they landed a 747, 707 and a Super Connie at Longreach!  But steps, luggage handling and other required infrastructure, I suspect, will negate this.  What a shame.  Those Dash 8s are really showing their age - noisy, cramped, tatty interior, tiny overhead bins...

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

28 Oct 2011

Total posts 462

Yes, you can land a B747 at Longreach - but it can't take off again. The runway needs to be longer for heavy aircraft to take off.

QF

11 Jul 2014

Total posts 966

I did a trip to Longreach last year, 48-hour turnaround, Dash 8 wasn't that bad someone had a Very Light Jet parked up at the terminal as well.

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

26 Feb 2020

Total posts 29

Agree the Dash8 are showing their age. The one thing they do have as an advantage is the short taxi and take off/landing. They are mostly quicker end to end than the 717’s on the Syd CBR route only because if this. Having said that the A220’s sound very appealing. Bring them on Qantas.

23 Jul 2017

Total posts 99

The Boeing 747 and 707 both landed at Longreach, never to leave, (and Longreach wouldn't want them to). Connie came out in containers on the train. She was pretty much a wreck in Manila. (Who remembers Winkie's Fish?) Those who loved Connies rescued her, crated her and sent her to Australia where the old-timer engineers, mechanics, etc put her together again. From the outside she looks great, but inside not quite so. Nevertheless it's good she now sits under the huge roof with her "younger" sisters. Enjoy the old girls. They're a joy to see.

14 Oct 2016

Total posts 104

The a220 design is very good for passengers as it is very hard airlines to crappify. The position of the toilets in the fuselage makes it hard to make them small like the new tiny lavatories on the 737, the width of the airplane allows for very wide seats but there isn't enough space for them to try to make it 6 abreast. So unlike a lot of other PR from airlines about there new aircraft being better, it is actually the case with the a220. 

The a220 is going to be good for Qantas opening up and adding capacity on long and thin routes (ie P-cns). I think it will also be helpful for flights out of SWZ

Air Canada - Aeroplan

28 Feb 2015

Total posts 112

Believe me, it can be crappified. I've flown Air Canada's 220 multiple times (only in J) and there are two problems: (1) no storage under the seat in front of you unless it's a thin laptop bag or small women's handbag, because of badly placed seat "legs" and assorted electronics. (Yes, some of us do like to make use of under-seat storage.) This makes finding overhead space even in J problematic - the only aircraft AC runs where this is a problem. (2) I don't know who manufactured the J seats, but there isn't even the remotest suggestion of lumbar support, so even a very short hop (1.5–2 hours) is a test of endurance. Hopefully QF will make a better job of this.

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

06 Oct 2016

Total posts 163

Great plane , did ZRH-MAD return on Swiss and details like the lockers make  a difference. Passenger comfort in noise and atmosphere is great for the class… A 737 is a bus  in comparison. 

Even the dreaded EuroBiz on the 2 side is half decent, as rhey alternate A and B, so no one reclines on you QA 2 x 2 will be much better than that

Thai Airways International - Royal Orchid Plus

15 Jan 2013

Total posts 464

I would happily if they can get these on most sectors fly one on Qantas.I have been on a couple of Virgin 737-700's recently and while no bad thing they showed their age big time(One was an ex KLM PLANE that's just arrived)while the second one was part of the last of them that replaced the original 737-400's of the then Virgin Blue.It wasn't that bad but it felt it's age

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

30 May 2013

Total posts 373

Really looking forward to flying on the Qantas A220. Although a great aircraft, the Boeing 717s are really starting to show their age now.

29 Jul 2019

Total posts 1

Hi David,

Great reading but can future reports include the likely passenger to toilet ratio.

Its okay for a 1 hour but becomes a issue longer flights and we all know QF attitude on toilets irrespective of the travel class.

24 Oct 2010

Total posts 2550

At this stage Qantas has said naught on the config apart from the number of seats in each cabin, but looking at the A220-300s of other airlines such as Air Canada, Delta and Swiss those all have what appears to be a standard fitout of one lav at the front for business class and two at the rear for economy.

Singapore Airlines - KrisFlyer

14 Jun 2017

Total posts 49

I have flown this aircraft on long-and-thin routes out of Montreal with Air Canada (mostly to Vancouver, San Francisco and Los Angeles) on several occasions - it is by and large the most pleasant experience you can have on a narrow-body aircraft, even in economy. I actively seek it out whenever I go to Montreal (which is often!)

This would be the perfect plane for Qantas to fly MEL/SYD --> DPS, and to pacific islands. 

10 Jan 2023

Total posts 1

The A220s are also assembled in Mobile, AL.

Joe
Joe

03 May 2013

Total posts 671

The Mobile ones are only intended for US carriers/customers. Canada assembly aircraft for rest of the world.

717 may have been quiet due to rear engines but overhead AC units were so loud that it negated much of the rear engine benefit.

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

27 Jan 2016

Total posts 17

Qantas haven't confirmed, but I doubt seatback video screens will be fitted, though definitely USB/AC power and probably some sort of device holder in the seat for streaming onboard entertainment and internet connectivity per a large chunk of the B737 fleet today. B717's don't have seatback screens and B737's that do will be phased out for the A32xneo. Not sure if the A32xneo will have seatback screens either, though the A350-1000's definitely will - not just for length of flights but it's BFE ie: airlines can't NOT fit an in-seat IFE system on those aircraft, even though globaly connectivity, streaming and personal device usage is becoming more and more the norm over time.

05 Mar 2015

Total posts 409

I agree the Qantas A220s will have USB power to all seats, probably shared AC in economy, but I think they will have seatback video screens. Other full-service airlines flying the A220 over long distance routes like Delta and Air Canada have seatback screens, and looking at the long routes Qantas plans for the A220 I reckon they'll do likewise.

03 Mar 2023

Total posts 14

They better have IFE.  I'm tired of Qantas' hit and miss approach to IFE on domestic flights.  It's pretty bad when you're more likely to get IFE on a US domestic flight!  Delta, United, Jet Blue etc. all have them on most if not all flights.  A 5 or 6 hour flight without an IFE screen is pretty substandard in my opinion.

01 Feb 2023

Total posts 2

Back in the day we used to either read or chat with our fellow passengers!

24 Jun 2020

Total posts 48

I love the A350's therefore given the comparison, I think I'm gonna love the A320 too for a shorter trip.

JKH
JKH

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

23 Sep 2017

Total posts 163

Give me one of these over a 737 any day!

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

05 Oct 2016

Total posts 100

So they have 20 B717s and the last will be gone once they have 6-7 A220's...?? How do you replace routes that 20 aircraft are doing, with 6-7?? *Confused look*

05 Mar 2015

Total posts 409

As the article says, the A220s "will be supplemented by QantasLink E190s leased from Alliance Airlines." I also expect we will see more A330s on domestic routes as more A380s and 787s pick up international routes, which will in turn free up more 737s for some routes flown by the 717s until more A220s arrive.

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

30 May 2013

Total posts 373

Yes, spot on. There are plenty of 737s in and out of Hobart now, that used to be all 717 routes.

26 Oct 2017

Total posts 25

Yes, I had the same reaction. And as for the Alliance planes -- they've already got them in service on QLink routes.

I'm going to take a punt that FFlyers will start flying routes subject to aircraft type and mix up which brands they fly rather than brand loyalty of just one airline. We are already seeing it happen with Bonza; once Bonza hits the Sydney market, I reckon all bets will be off. I can see myself flying Qantas, Virgin, Rex and Bonza.

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

28 Oct 2011

Total posts 462

The vast majority will do what they've always done - choose flights based on ticket price. Most people have little idea what aircraft they are on, other than "big" or "small."

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

21 Jul 2013

Total posts 57

Sounds good, and hopefully the qualitative improvement over Boeing aircraft should be noticeable. Airbus has scores on the board already with the A380 (better to fly on than anything else), and the A350 is a much better passenger experience than the B787, so I hope A220 will follow suit. 

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

16 Jan 2018

Total posts 50

There are a lot of positive review regarding A220 in this forum, but I wonder if they are based on short-haul flights.

I can see how it may be great for short haul, but I have serious doubts on its suitability for medium-haul flights to Southeast Asia. No matter how comfortable it is, being cramped for 8-hour or so in a 3-3 abreast configuration with only 2 toilets at the back... yeah, not for me.

I still fly Qantas internationally, just to Southeast asia destinations (and the only reason is that they have the most direct routes), but the moment they switch to A220 is probably the day I will stop flying Qantas altogether. Unless the design of A220 for medium haul flights is indeed significantly different enough from what is being shown on this article.

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

30 May 2013

Total posts 373

The A220 economy cabin isn't 3-3, it's in a 2-3 configuration.

25 Nov 2022

Total posts 2

You should update the article with the real seat map, as found on the qantas site:

https://www.qantas.com/content/dam/qantas/pdfs/qantas-experience/onboard/seatmaps/a220-300-seatmap.pdf

24 Oct 2010

Total posts 2550

Nice catch, thanks – will definitely update the article with this – great to see everything falling into place as the A220 delivery draws near!

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

26 May 2014

Total posts 463

The Qantas seat map suggests a larger seat pitch for the Y left side seats in front of the exit row.  Will be interest to see how these are sold and if Q are going to follow VA with economy +.

01 Dec 2012

Total posts 52

For economy passengers, great to see two loos at the end of la trek aft (boom, boom). Better passenger to toilet ratio than bigger planes.

17 Sep 2015

Total posts 388

Who wants to fly on single aisle aircraft to southeast Asia from Oz?

Not this little Vegemite.  Yuk!

Doesn't that depend on where in Australia you are and what your options are? Sure, I'd rather do a long flight like Sydney to Singapore in a 787 or A350, and I don't think we will see the A220 on that route ever. But if Qantas puts the A220 onto say Canberra-Auckland, well it's a short flight and a modern plane and a direct A220 flight has got to be better than flying CBR-SYD and then having to do that awful transit for a 737 SYD-AKL. Adelaide is another example, maybe the A220 will let Qantas start international routes like Adelaide-Bali, and that will also beat the current option which is no flight at all or doing a transit somewhere.

Virgin Australia - Velocity Rewards

24 Jan 2018

Total posts 717

QJE6076 landed SYD @ 12:11p.  Exciting times ahead for QFF.

Etihad - Etihad Guest

13 Jun 2019

Total posts 14

Qantas penny pinching on the IFE will be sold to the customers as a virtue signalling exercise about how much green house gas is saved blah blah blah. Its a commercial decision to save the capital cost of the IFE and reduce fuel spend by the weight saving. If these aircraft are going to be employed on longer thinner routeas as per the Qantas promotional graphics, follow on aircraft will have to be fitted with IFE.

Virgin Australia - Velocity Rewards

24 Jan 2018

Total posts 717

Trust me, I'm no fanboy for Qantas, but I do think this is a smarter move.  I'd hope the capital/maintenance cost saving on screens and fuel savings on operations will lead to a better quality of news services streaming through the IFE App (don't bother with ABC's iView).  Much prefer my own iPad/Tablet and headphones on which to download content for longer flight (i.e. over 90 minutes in the air).  

JJ1
JJ1

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

23 Sep 2015

Total posts 28

I'm more than happy to stream entertainment to my i-pad and yes it does seem that more and more airlines are moving in this direction. The free wi-fi on Qantas is one of the best things that they have done

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

30 Nov 2011

Total posts 25

It feels very budget carrier to not have seatback screens.  I really appreciate airlines like Air Canada which are so consistent with their product offering fleet-wide.  For a full service airline like Qantas to not offer seatback screens it's a penny pinching exercise which I find disappointing.  

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

10 Apr 2012

Total posts 316

One downside of not having seatback entertainment is having to stow your device during takeoff & landing, whereas seatback entertainment, most airlines will let you watch your program from gate to gate... this will probably mean cabin crew will also be required to do the safety demo instead of watching it on the inflight screens.

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

18 Feb 2015

Total posts 124

What a terrible choice on the IFE…. Or lack of… you would expect it on JQ not QF who want to charge a premium for an alleged premium service 

09 Jan 2024

Total posts 1

I politely disagree and I am not affiliated to Qantas. Nowadays, who doesn't have a wifi-able personal device. As the article mentioned saving upward of 200kg means lighter, consume less fuel meaning cheaper operations which translate to affordable fares to access comfortable accommodations like wider seats, larger windows and toilets, roomier interior, etc. No seatback displays also mean less repair and maintenance which mean less downtime which mean lesser delays or cancellations. Technologies constantly evolves. By letting passengers use their own devices means they have a choice from phone to largest laptop with latest technology, instead of seatback displays which would be out-of-date in no time.

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

03 Mar 2014

Total posts 20

You can still use your own device if seatback screens are provided, but you are forced to use your device if there are no screens. I personally hate using my phone during flight as you either need to hold it or (if provided) sit it quite a distance away on a seatback holder. Laptops aren't a great solution on short flights given they have to be stowed for take-off and landing. The ideal solution (for me) would be seatback screens that you could stream content from your own device to.

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

28 Nov 2016

Total posts 4

Would be great if these new Airbus orders opened up some international routes out of Adelaide with the extra range offered. Getting a bit tired of always having to connect via Melbourne / Sydney. Feels like a bit of a palm to the face of South Australians at the moment. Every other city is served well internationally except Adelaide. Would be great to travel to London via Singapore and scissor on to QF1 in Singapore for those travelling on. 

24 Aug 2011

Total posts 1204

I think QF operating ADL-SIN again is is very likely though more probable when the A321XLRs arrive rather than the A220s.  Until then, you can use Australia's other international airline.....SQ.

 

25 Jun 2018

Total posts 46

Wally69.  My Wife & I don’t.

25 Feb 2015

Total posts 58

Not surprised with this cabin outcome but disappointed. Gone are the days when Australian airlines smoked North American counterparts given Delta, Air Canada and JetBlue all have seatback screens

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

14 Jan 2015

Total posts 35

Umm....so it's nice but hardly ground breaking particularly in Business Class. Economy looks good though. What's going to be very disappointing is if these are the new Business Class seats for the A321XLR's, because, compared to United and Delta's very cool new Business Class seats (Domestic First Class) for their new A321Neo's for example these new Qantas Business Class seats are looking very ordinary already.  And no fixed cabin divider -? not even a full length screen ....I really don't like that .

04 Sep 2022

Total posts 6

Totally agree. Whilst better than economy, anything over 4 hours in this seat is going to be mighty uncomfortable. The A220 may have the legs to travel to SE Asia, but I'll choose another carrier with lie flat any day of the week if they start using it for international flights.

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

11 Oct 2014

Total posts 692

David, an excellent review of the new A220-300. However, there is one point missing from the review.

 Can you confirm whether Qantas [has / has not] opted for the slightly wider seat width in the Y class 'E' seats ? This feature (if implemented) allows the middle-seat passengers an extra inch of 'wiggle' room, making that seat slightly more attractive.

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

09 Jun 2017

Total posts 55

I can’t believe that Qantas has been talking this up for close on 2 years. An aircraft that most of us probably won’t fly on. What we really need is to replace the dreaded 373s and 330s.

NT
NT

30 Apr 2013

Total posts 13

I’m guessing this is very similar to what the new Jetstar 787 product will be. Wrapped in leather in both cabins.

04 Sep 2022

Total posts 6

Business class very uninspiring and looks just as cramped as the 737. . Will the reduced number of business class seats mean a price hike for these seats or less availability for Rewards seats? I've just received a notification from QF that my flight to Melbourne will now be in the new A220.  Business class seat on the Embraer has far more legroom and is much more comfortable 

.

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

26 Apr 2011

Total posts 18

Don't like the sound of 30" pitch in economy. How lousy can Qantas get?  And I thought their previous reduction to a tight 31" economy standard across much of their fleet was miserable.

08 Jul 2014

Total posts 14

The 737-800 fleet has always been 30”. So whilst it’s not desirable, it’s no surprise either. 

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

09 Feb 2015

Total posts 385

Far from being an innovative leader. Massive oversight with no IFE for a so called 'full service airline'.

01 Dec 2012

Total posts 52

On domestic, I’ll  take fast and free wifi over IFE any time. Allows me to both work AND play

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

26 Nov 2012

Total posts 121

I hardly see anyone watching the IFE these days, most are on their own device.  No IFE is smart and is the future esp if you can stream to your own device and recharge at the same time and not have to use this awful headsets. Buy some Bose noise cancelling and you’ll be laughing 

12 Aug 2020

Total posts 6

Looking great! Are they going to bring back the privacy curtain between business class and economy class?

emd
emd

Singapore Airlines - KrisFlyer

17 Oct 2014

Total posts 12

Looking forward to travelling on one.

Minor correction-although the 717 dates back to the nineties(it was originally to have been the MD95),the fuselage and windows come from the DC9 which first flew in 1965

Is the middle seat on the 3 side wider? My recollection of one of it's selling points and having travelled on one several years ago was that the Middle seat  was a an inch wider to pro idea more comfort. It would be disappointing if this had been removed (more so than the lack of IFE) 

24 Oct 2010

Total posts 2550

Hi Tour_contact: yes, there's an option for airlines to specify the middle seat as being a bit wider (19" instead of 18"), but Qantas is among the airlines which chose not to do this, in order to give that extra inch to the aisle.

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

11 Oct 2014

Total posts 692

@david - and thanks from me, as well. It answers the question I asked 22nd Feb. 

Any insight into why Qantas has chosen not to take advantage of this option? My guess would be it is only because it may have had an impact on either the aisle width, or the ability to make all three of the right-hand block of three ALL marginally wider ?

24 Oct 2010

Total posts 2550

No special insight, airlines can choose to have all three seats on the right-hand side the same width for either/both the reasons you mentioned. Also it might be the case that while the Safran seats designed and offered on the A220 have this wider-middle-seat config, that might not have been an option on the Recaro seats chosen by Qantas.

Virgin Australia - Velocity Rewards

24 Jan 2018

Total posts 717

Can someone please remind me whether these A200s will also replace the Dash-8 aircraft in QF fleet, as well as replacing the B717s?   With this rollout taking so long, I've lost track.  Thanks in advance.

31 Mar 2014

Total posts 380

no, they are not

Qantas - Qantas Frequent Flyer

13 Nov 2018

Total posts 109

I have just spoken to a fellow traveller in the Qantas business lounge about the A220. They sing its praises both for economy and business class. They will be deliberately booking flights that feature A2, 20, rather than the nasty, clapped out, Boeing, 737–800

31 Jan 2013

Total posts 44

No way I'll be spending my hard earned Business Class cash to fly internationally on an A220. On a short domestic like Canberra - Melbourne for sure but on international its widebody or nothing. Why on earth would anyone pay for a 737/A220 Business seat to, say, Auckland when for the same price or less you can get a spacious 777 or 787? Interesting to hear they'll use them at the Western Sydney White Elephant, clearly indicating that they don't think many people will be using that airport. In fact I wouldn't be surprised to see some configured as all Economy to cater for the mostly VFR market that will use that airport.


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